Kron Excited about Fair’s Showcase for Indiana Ag

first_img Kron Excited about Fair’s Showcase for Indiana Ag Facebook Twitter Farm Bureau at the fairThe Indiana State Fair is off and running and Indiana Farm Bureau is one of the many organizations dedicating time, energy and resources, and a love of agriculture to the 17-day run of the fair. President Randy Kron says it’s a great 17 days.“It’s a place we get to showcase Indiana agriculture and let the citizens of Indiana come and see what we do. I’m proud of Indiana farmers and what we do and how we take care of our farms and animals. You know the livestock being here, the shows. I think you see the passion in the farmers who raise their animals, and that they really care. And there’s the interaction with consumers and how they let us tell our story and how we raise their food.”Randy KronKron told HAT there is a very simple reason Indiana Farm Bureau supports the young people who compete at the fair, and at fairs around the state. He says it’s an investment in the future leaders of our communities.“It’s important that we help bring up the next generation so they can see that giving back to your communities is important. It’s building future leaders.”Farm Bureau has an action packed state fair, including a busy Farmers Day on August 17th that starts with a giant breakfast.“We kick it off with the pancake breakfast, then also the 16th, 17th, and 18th of August is the Taste of Indiana Farms which is here in the Farm Bureau building, and you’ll get to see a little bit of the products that are raised right here in Indiana by Indiana farmers, so it’s a great opportunity to interact.”If you’re not a member Kron says stop in the Farm Bureau building and ask how membership is benefiting other farmers.“We’d love to have them here. Free popcorn every day and it’s air conditioned, so those hot days this is a great place, and I’d love to sit down and talk a little about agriculture. I have a passion for it and all of our members do, so they’d enjoy talking to them.” Previous articleCorn and Soybeans Need Rain NowNext articleLt. Governor Candidates Take on Ag Issues Andy Eubank SHARE By Andy Eubank – Aug 9, 2016 Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Kron Excited about Fair’s Showcase for Indiana Aglast_img read more

To protect and to serve: The growing militarization of America’s police force

first_imgStamper said that last year he watched Ferguson police make the same mistakes he did.“My reaction was, ‘Please learn from my mistakes, from what I did and did not do during the week of WTO,’” Stamper said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “Don’t tear gas nonviolent and non-threatening protesters. And for God’s sake, don’t bring dogs out … It’s a throwback to the ‘60s and Bull Connor. The imagery sucks. It was really painful to see the images I saw from Ferguson.”Everything changed on Sept. 11, 2001. After a terrorist attack on U.S. soil, police departments had to prepare themselves for anything and everything.Since 9/11, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has given an extra $35 billion to buy new gear to “fight terrorists” and because of surplus in Iraq, law enforcement agencies have an additional $5 billion worth of 1033 gear.Mathis said that having access to this kind of equipment is needed for departments, especially after events like 9/11 and the recent terrorist attack in Paris.“We’re very much still in the community relation-type mode, but when these things happen — like 9/11, like they just had in Paris — we have to be ready for these things,” Mathis said. “We have to be ready to go into, so to speak, combat. We have to make sure that our law enforcement has the equipment needed to go into those types of situations.”The key, Mathis said, is balance.“The difficult thing is to balance that — when you are going to use those things, when you are going to deploy that type of equipment,” Mathis said. “Sometimes it’s a gamble and you’re not always going to win.”Powell agreed and said having access to this type of equipment has aided in many situations that could have turned very dangerous and in already dangerous situations. But he said the problem is that the line where police end and military begins is getting a little blurry.“In a riot situation a lot of times it will escalate an issue because neither side will back down,” Powell said. “A lot of departments are using things like tear gas and MRAPs for crowd control. When you start using them other than what they’re designed for, it leaves a bad taste in the civilian world’s mouth.”A symptom of separation Dr. Johnny Nahn is the director of TCU’s online masters program in Criminal Justice and Criminology and an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice.Nahn said the militarization of police is really a symptom of something more in policing.“It’s something that’s an outgrowth of police-citizen relationships that have deteriorated over the last few decades,” Nahn said. “We saw it in the Watts riots, Rodney King riots, and then more recently in Ferguson, but that’s a symptom of the separation between the police and public.”When police separated from the community they began to view their jobs as dangerous, Nahn said.“When you don’t know the community and you start assuming that they’re dangerous you start to develop a subculture,” Nahn said. “ You develop the mentality ‘it’s us versus them.’ When you’re outnumbered and treat people as they’re dangerous, you have to send a message that, although you’re not a lot in numbers, you have the amount of force necessary to control a population.”Jamison said that today the military grade gear and is a tool to enforce that control.“If you have a large group of people, you don’t know how many are carrying a gun,” Jamison said. “You have to assume, but you don’t control those and you have to prepare for that.”Walk the walk and talk the talkFor over 30 years, politicians and law enforcement agencies have been talking, training, arming and dressing officers as if they’re deploying for combat.Today the typical SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) team conducts missions dressed in the following: Lace up combat boots complete with boot knives; black, camouflage, or olive colored pants and shirts; a black balaclava hood; Kevlar helmets and vests; gas masks, knee and elbow pads, gloves, communication equipment, assault rifles and military grade weapons like the Heckler and Koch MP5 submachine gun – the preferred model of U.S. Navy Seals.Ballistic shields, battering rams, smoke and flash bang grenades; pepper spray and tear gas are all considered standard equipment.Battle dress like this is worn on almost daily use for tactical operations. Many times the police are indistinguishable from the military itself.While the gear, weapons and tanks play a major role in the militarization of departments, so does the effect of all of this war talk and battle rhetoric.While the gear, weapons and tanks play a major role in the militarization of departments, so does the effect all of this war talk and battle rhetoric.“When local police officers are talk, train and equip themselves for war, they’re bound to act like they’re at war,” Powell said.Police adopted military titles and the top-down structure from the beginning.“They adopted a very paramilitary command structure where you had the sergeant, lieutenant, chief, captain, for example,” Nahn said. “You have very rigid training and that was all adopted from the military.”Words like “ranger division,” preparing for “close quarters combat” in a “tactical environment,” “field operations,” “battle” and “war” are used everyday referring to city operations.Mathis said that there are many officers with the mindset that they are in war.“I think it’s a common feeling that you’re out there and on display,” Mathis said. “Your goal is to go to work and do your job, but come home. You go out there and you’re combating.” Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Linkedin Facebook Linkedin Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ Twitter ReddIt IMAGE: Good Karma Ripple Effect: TCU professor talks gravitational waves Comin’ Up: saying goodbye to the gang life Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/ The cause of a fire that engulfed a duplex on Lubbock Avenue late Monday night has not been determined, and no injuries have been reported as of early Tuesday morning.Five fire trucks responded to 911 calls around 10:10 p.m., according to Richard Harrison, fire department spokesperson. Beth Griffithhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/beth-griffith/center_img Twitter ReddIt Facebook Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store printWhen rioters flooded the streets of Ferguson, Missouri in the fall of 2014, they were met by police officers wearing military grade gear and camouflage, equipped with tear gas, flash-bang grenades, rubber bullets, accompanied by canine units and driving armored vehicles.When school let out in the Mondawmin neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland this April, students and others at a nearby shopping mall faced police officers, some in full body armor, wearing helmets, and carrying shields, batons and assault rifles.In August of 2013, workers and their children at the Garden of Eden organic farm in Arlington, Texas were woken by the sounds of nearly two dozen SWAT officers storming through the property riding in armoured vehicles, wearing all-black body armor, carrying shields and assault rifles.These weren’t isolated incidents. Police departments across the nation have been quietly arming themselves for battle for decades.Federal programs like the 1033 program (formerly the 1208 program) allow the Secretary of Defense to transfer excess Department of Defense (DOD) property to federal, state and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs) free of charge.According to a White House Report, since 1990 the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has given excess military equipment to approximately 8,000 federal and state law enforcement agencies across the nation to the tune of $5.1 billion in total property, including $2.7 billion in the last five years.During the year of 2014, approximately 96 percent (1.8 million pieces) of the property given to LEAs was non-controlled, meaning, according to the report, it doesn’t have military attributes. These items included office furniture, first aid kits, storage containers and lockers to name a few.According to the report, roughly four percent (78,000 pieces) of the equipment was controlled property such as night vision devices, High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs or Humvees), Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles (MRAPs), aircraft and watercraft.To date the report shows that there are approximately 460,000 pieces of controlled property possessed by LEAs. The DOD released the records of agencies that obtained equipment through federal programs and NPR has compiled those lists here.Since 2006, Tarrant County has a combined total of over 72 assault rifles, 29 night vision pieces, two mine resistant ambush protection vehicles (MRAPs), and one other armored vehicle, according to the Department of Defense.But Tarrant County isn’t unique. LEAs across Texas have been strategically stockpiling a cache of military weaponry and equipment acquired primarily through the 1033 program.Between 2013 and 2014, police departments across Texas received 105,593 pieces of equipment valued at a total of $146 million, according to the Texas state property book.This equipment ranges from scopes to automatic rifles to submachine guns to MRAPs to bayonets.And this equipment isn’t just going to large cities. Small towns like Cleburne, Texas are taking all the military grade gear they can get.Retired Cleburne Police Chief Terry Powell said the ease of obtaining the equipment encourages departments to take advantage.“It wasn’t particularly a need-based system,”  Powell said. “You take departments in cities of 20 thousand and you have MRAPs. But the way the government program works, all you have to do is apply for it and pick it up.”To receive property through the 1033 program, LEAs have to submit a request that indicates what each item will be used for. Once an application is approved the property must be used within a year.Fort Worth Police Lieutenant and member of FWPD’s training division Bryan Jamison said that departments with a low budget like to take advantage these federal programs.“They’re really expensive pieces of equipment,” Jamison said. “So, if it’s free, of course you’re going to take it and of course you’re going to use it.”However, these federal programs don’t give LEAs training on how or when the equipment can be appropriately deployed.“If you look at Ferguson and those officers, I’ll bet you every single officer had to look at that equipment for a very long time to figure out how to even put it on,” Jamison said.While equipment and weapons like these may be necessary for self-protection in extreme circumstances, easy access and a lack of training have encouraged police to use this heavy gear – explicitly for the use on battlefields – on suburb and city streets.And where speaking out against the police has generally been discouraged, after events like Ferguson and Baltimore, critics and civil libertarians have shown consistent public outrage about the militarization of police forces.Protectors need protectionBy nature of the job, officers risk their lives to keep the public safe. Programs such as the 1033 program allow police departments to out-train, out-dress and out-gun the people they are trying to arrest.From the 60s through the 90s police were often underprepared and under equipped. Driving a metal Dodge with nothing but a bullet proof vest and a handgun or a shotgun, police were often unprepared when situations turned dangerous.Bill Mathis served over 30 years in Oklahoma law enforcement. Mathis said the pivotal moment when the police began to shift towards a military mentality was after that 1997 shootout where many officers were shot and had to break into a gun shop to arm themselves.“A lot of officers got shot and had a hard time eliminating those guys,” Mathis said. “We didn’t really have the weapons to deal with that and LAPD was on the forefront of SWAT teams. I think that was the point that we started looking and going through the process of getting different types of weaponry and getting geared up.”With a bloated military and a worsening drug crisis, law enforcement agencies across the country were armed with military surplus by 1999.During the World Trade Organization (WTO) protests in 1999, Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper said he geared and dressed up officers like storm troopers and marched them down city streets.Seattle police clear an intersection of World Trade Organization protesters at Sixth and University Streets, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 1999 in Seattle. Thousands of protesters took to the street to try and stop the WTO meeting. (AP Photo/Stevan Morgain)Seattle police use gas to push back World Trade Organization protesters in downtown Seattle Tuesday, Nov. 30, 1999. The protests delayed the opening of the WTO third ministerial conference. (AP Photo/Eric Draper) Beth Griffith Severe thunderstorms moving through Fort Worth Beth Griffith is a senior journalism major from Cleburne, Texas. She will commission as a 2LT Military Intelligence officer in the United States Army in May. In her free time, she is authoring a clean eating cook book and enjoys volunteering and boxing. Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday + posts Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Previous articleSpecial Project: to protect and to serveNext articleZBonz Dog Park to open in February  Beth Griffith RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

Hong Kong: the Attack on the Chinese Regime’s Mouthpiece Xinhua does not serve the cause of journalism

first_img ChinaHong KongAsia – Pacific Condemning abuses to go further China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison ChinaHong KongAsia – Pacific Condemning abuses News June 7, 2021 Find out more News On Saturday November 2nd, the lobby of China’s state-run Xinhua News Agency in Hong Kong’s Wanchai district was set on fire and several windows and glass doors were smashed. The fire was later controlled and no casualties were reported. Xinhua (New China) News Agency, which is closely controlled by the Chinese Communist Party, is notorious as the mouthpiece of the Beijing regime.Reporters Without Borders (RSF) nevertheless firmly condemns this attack that could have had dramatic consequences. “It is normal to oppose the activities of Xinhua, which serves the interests of the Chinese State and not those of the public, however the act of setting fire on its premises does not serve in any way the cause of journalism,” says Cédric Alviani, head of RSF East Asia Bureau, who expressed the concern that this incident “could serve as an excuse for new attacks against independent journalists.”Since the beginning of the protests in June, there have been numerous cases of abuse against the media in Hong Kong, mostly perpetrated by the law enforcement or pro-Beijing gangs. The demonstrations originally started against an Extradition Bill which has since been withdrawn. Protesters’ demands have now evolved into calls for democratic reforms.In the RSF World Press Freedom Index, Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China, has plummeted from 18th in 2002 to 73rd this year. PHOTO: ANTHONY WALLACE / AFP Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the arson attack against China’s mouthpiece Xinhua News Agency last weekend in Hong Kong that could serve as an excuse for new attacks against independent journalists. Receive email alerts June 2, 2021 Find out morecenter_img RSF_en Mongolia : RSF urges presidential candidates to voice support for press freedom November 4, 2019 – Updated on November 6, 2019 Hong Kong: the Attack on the Chinese Regime’s Mouthpiece Xinhua does not serve the cause of journalism Follow the news on Asia – Pacific Help by sharing this information June 2, 2021 Find out more Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists News Organisation Newslast_img read more

TV cameraman shot in the back, police blame “stray bullet”

first_img Reporters Without Borders has learned that Dunya News TV cameraman Fayyaz was shot in the back today while covering a meeting of the Punjab provincial assembly in Lahore. It was unclear who fired the shot but fellow journalists said they thought it was a targeted attack linked to his coverage of criticism of an important local party called Nawaz.Fayyaz was rushed to hospital after the shooting and was said to be out of danger.Reporters Without Borders urges the police to carry out a serious investigation with the aim of quickly identifying those responsible for the shooting. It also calls on Punjab law minister Rana Sanaullah Khan to keep his promise to cooperate with the media and to ensure that the police do not rule out the possibility that today’s shooting was targeted. Fayyaz was shot when he and other journalists went to interview members of the provincial assembly in a tent that had been specially erected for the occasion.The police said Fayyaz appeared to have been hit by a “stray bullet.” But, in the absence of any other shooting in the area, this was strongly disputed by members of the Punjab Union of Journalists (PUJ), who said they would boycott the assembly until an independent investigation into the shooting was carried out. Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists March 14, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 TV cameraman shot in the back, police blame “stray bullet” April 21, 2021 Find out more June 2, 2021 Find out more News PakistanAsia – Pacific Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder News Follow the news on Pakistan Receive email alerts RSF_en News “It was deliberate attempt and the journalist was targeted,” PUJ president Rana Azeem told Reporters Without Borders.Today’s incident was preceded by tension and scathing media criticism of Nawaz, which had been accused of advocating anti-democratic standards and taking bribes from controversial Muslim pressure groups. to go further PakistanAsia – Pacific News Organisation Help by sharing this information Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire January 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

McDonald violates bond, back in jail

first_img Twitter Previous articleFive things you need to know today, April 12Next articleThree injured in two-car crash admin Facebook Facebook Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Grace McDonald is led through the Ector County Courthouse after her pre-trial hearing Jan. 25 in Judge James Rush’s courtroom. She faces a count of capital murder of multiple persons, conspiracy to commit capital murder and prohibited sexual conduct. Her brother, Gabe McDonald, who is accused of pulling the trigger, faces a single count of capital murder of multiple persons. A pre-trial hearing for 23-year-old Elizabeth Grace McDonald was pushed back Thursday after she was arrested Wednesday after reportedly violating bond conditions.McDonald, 23, who is facing charges of capital murder of multiple persons, criminal conspiracy and prohibited sexual conduct, bonded out of jail Feb. 2 after nearly a year-and-a-half in jail. She and her adoptive sibling, Gabe McDonald, are accused of fatally shooting their parents, Gregg and Jana McDonald, in the early morning hours of March 2, 2016 in their Conley Avenue home.Ector County District Judge James Rush signed an order Wednesday to issue a warrant for McDonald for violating bond conditions, court records show, but did the order not indicate what bond condition was violated. The hearing was rescheduled for 11 a.m. April 23.Ector County Sheriff’s Office Spokesman Sgt. Gary Duesler said Thursday morning McDonald was arrested Wednesday in Midland County, but she had not yet been transferred to Ector County.Rush lowered McDonald’s bond amount from $2 million to $200,000 after a pre-trial hearing Jan. 25 with newly assigned prosecution after Ector County District Attorney Bobby Bland recused his office in December.Bond conditions set by the judge included McDonald could not attempt to injure herself, which she had done in the past prosecution previously told the court, and that she would only be able to reside with Amanda and Christopher Richardson. Amanda Richardson was a “longstanding friend” of McDonald’s, a motion to reduce bond stated.Other bond conditions included that McDonald report to a pretrial supervision officer once per month, she have a curfew of 9 p.m., she could have no contact by any means with her grandparents Monty and Betty Wootten, nor with her brother Gabe McDonald, and she would submit to random drug testing.Court records show a motion to modify special conditions of bond was filed April 5 by Grace McDonald’s defense attorney Steven Brand. The motion stated McDonald had forged a close relationship with Rebecca and Darren Browder of Midland while being supervised and it would be “more manageable for all involved” if she resided with them instead of the Richardson’s.Rebecca Browder was identified by McDonald’s defense attorneys as the investigator hired by the firm to assist in McDonald’s case, records show.A bond report filed Tuesday by Jimmy Ruiz, Director at Ector County Post Sentence/Pretrial Monitoring program, stated he was notified of the motion to change McDonald’s residence and that Amanda Richardson did not want McDonald back in her residence due to “personality conflicts.”The move was later approved by Rush and defense attorney Thomas Fagerberg advised Ruiz that Amanda Richardson did not want McDonald returning to her home, “even for the purpose of getting her belongings,” the bond report stated.Ruiz reported that Rebecca Browder would make arrangements to pick up McDonald’s belongings, at which time he advised Browder to also pick up the base unit for monitoring equipment and take it to her Midland County residence.A jury trial for Elizabeth McDonald is scheduled for June 25. Her adoptive brother, Gabe McDonald, who is only facing one felony count of capital murder of multiple persons has a pre-trial scheduled for 2 p.m. May 8 with Rush and a trial date of June 11.Gabe McDonald is accused of pulling the trigger during the fatal shooting. He is being represented by local attorney Justin Low. ORIGINAL STORY: Elizabeth Grace McDonald is back behind bars after a warrant for her arrest was issued due to violating bond conditions.Ector County District Judge James Rush signed an order to issue a warrant for McDonald on Wednesday for violating bond conditions, court records show, but did not indicate what bond condition was violated.McDonald, 23, who is facing charges of capital murder of multiple persons, criminal conspiracy and prohibited sexual conduct, bonded out of jail Feb. 2 after nearly a year-and-a-half in jail. She and her adoptive sibling, Gabe McDonald, are accused of fatally shooting their parents, Gregg and Jana McDonald, in the early morning hours of March 2, 2016 in their Conley Avenue home.Ector County Sheriff’s Office Spokesman Sgt. Gary Duesler said this morning McDonald was arrested Wednesday in Midland County, but she had not been transferred to Ector County yet.Rush lowered McDonald’s bond amount from $2 million to $200,000 after a pre-trial hearing Jan. 25 with newly assigned prosecution after Ector County District Attorney Bobby Bland recused his office in December.Bond conditions set by the judge included McDonald could not attempt to injure herself, which she had done in the past prosecution previously told the court, and that she would only be able to reside with Amanda and Christopher Richardson. Amanda Richardson was a “longstanding friend” of McDonald’s, a motion to reduce bond stated.Other bond conditions included that McDonald report to a pretrial supervision officer once per month, she have a curfew of 9 p.m., she could have no contact by any means with her grandparents Monty and Betty Wootten, nor with her brother Gabe McDonald, and she would submit to random drug testing.Court records show a motion to modify special conditions of bond was filed April 5 by Grace McDonald’s defense attorney Steven Brand. The motion stated McDonald had forged a close relationship with Rebecca and Darren Browder of Midland while being supervised and it would be “more manageable for all involved.”Rebecca Browder was identified by McDonald’s defense attorneys as the investigator hired by the firm to assist in McDonald’s case, records show.A bond report filed Tuesday by Jimmy Ruiz, Director at Ector County Post Sentence/Pretrial Monitoring program, stated he was notified of the motion to change McDonald’s residence and that Amanda Richardson did not want McDonald back in her residence due to “personality conflicts.”The move was later approved by Rush and defense attorney Thomas Fagerberg advised Ruiz that Amanda Richardson did not want McDonald returning to her home, “even for the purpose of getting her belongings,” the bond report stated.Ruiz reported that Rebecca Browder would make arrangements to pick up McDonald’s belongings, at which time he advised Browder to also pick up the base unit for monitoring equipment and take it to her Midland County residence.McDonald is set to appear for a pre-trial hearing at 2 p.m. today in Rush’s courtroom.This story will be updated as more information becomes available. Pinterest Local NewsCrime By admin – April 12, 2018 Pinterest McDonald violates bond, back in jaillast_img read more

The Ground That Allegations Of Fraud Are Not Arbitrable Is A Wholly Archaic View, Deserves To Be Discarded: Supreme Court

Top StoriesThe Ground That Allegations Of Fraud Are Not Arbitrable Is A Wholly Archaic View, Deserves To Be Discarded: Supreme Court LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK12 Jan 2021 9:35 PMShare This – xThe ground that allegations of fraud are not arbitrable is a wholly archaic view, which has become obsolete, and deserves to be discarded, the Supreme Court observed in a judgment delivered yesterday (11 Jan 2021).The bench observed thus while holding that the allegations of fraud with respect to the invocation of the Bank Guarantee are arbitrable, since it arises out of disputes between…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe ground that allegations of fraud are not arbitrable is a wholly archaic view, which has become obsolete, and deserves to be discarded, the Supreme Court observed in a judgment delivered yesterday (11 Jan 2021).The bench observed thus while holding that the allegations of fraud with respect to the invocation of the Bank Guarantee are arbitrable, since it arises out of disputes between parties inter se, and is not in the realm of public law.One of the issues considered by the bench in this appeal was whether allegations of fraudulent invocation of the bank guarantee furnished under the substantive contract, would be an arbitrable dispute. The High court, in this case, had held that the allegations of fraud did not constitute a criminal offence which would entail recording of voluminous evidence and therefore the disputes could be resolved through arbitration. It was observed that the allegations of fraud made in this case are simple, which do not in the normal course constitute any criminal offence, nor are the allegations so complex in nature which would entail extensive evidence being led, hence the disputes could be resolved through arbitration.Allegations Of Fraud Arbitrable When They Relate To Civil Dispute: Supreme Court Overrules ‘N Radhakrishnan’ Judgment If it is clear that a civil dispute involves questions of fraud, misrepresentation, etc. which can be the subject matter of a proceeding under Section 17 of the Indian Contract, 1872, and/or the tort of deceit, the mere fact that criminal proceedings can or have been instituted in respect of the same subject matter, would not lead to the conclusion that a dispute which is otherwise arbitrable, ceases to be so, the Court noted the legal position as held in many judgments including in the recent judgment in Vidya Drolia & Others v. Durga Trading Corporation. The court said: The ground on which fraud was held to be non arbitrable earlier was that it would entail voluminous and extensive evidence, and would be too complicated to be decided in arbitration. In contemporary arbitration practice, arbitral tribunals are required to traverse through volumes of material in various kinds of disputes such as oil, natural gas, construction industry, etc. The ground that allegations of fraud are not arbitrable is a wholly archaic view, which has become obsolete, and deserves to be discarded. However, the criminal aspect of fraud, forgery, or fabrication, which would be visited with penal consequences and criminal sanctions can be adjudicated only by a court of law, since it may result in a conviction, which is in the realm of public law. On the issue whether voidable agreements are arbitrable, the court said that such disputes would be arbitrable, since the issue whether the consent was procured by coercion, fraud, or misrepresentation requires to be adjudicated upon by leading cogent evidence, which can very well be decided through arbitration. Until it so proved and upheld as per Sections 2(i) and (j) of the Indian Contract Act, 1872 such an agreement would remain enforceable, and is not void, it added.Also Read : Whether Non-Payment Of Stamp Duty On Commercial Contract Will Invalidate Arbitration Agreement? Supreme Court Refers Issue To Constitution Bench CASE: N.N. GLOBAL MERCANTILE PVT. LTD VS. INDO UNIQUE FLAME LTD. [CIVIL APPEAL NOS. 3802 – 3803 / 2020] CORAM: Justices DY Chandrachud, Indu Malhotra and Indira Banerjee CITATION: LL 2021 SC 13Click here to Read/Download Judgment Read Judgment Next Story read more

Feds charge DC-area man accused of plotting to ram stolen truck into pedestrians, sources say

first_imgkrblokhin/iStock(WASHINGTON) — Federal authorities have charged a man they believe was plotting to ram a stolen truck into pedestrians at the National Harbor development in Maryland, just outside the nation’s capital, sources familiar with the matter told ABC News.The Justice Department is expected to announce details from the case later Monday.This is a developing story. Please check back updates.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img

Cincinnati Zoo lets you listen to a baby rhino’s heartbeat — and help save the species

first_imgCincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden(CINCINNATI) — Not only can you see the rhinoceros at the Cincinnati Zoo, but now visitors can listen to the heartbeat of a baby rhino in a new exhibit experience.The exhibit features Charlotte, a life-sized, pregnant black rhinoceros replica that stands in the lobby of the Lindner Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) at the zoo.Zoo visitors learn about the endangered species and efforts to preserve them, including the latest reproductive technology. That’s where they put their learning to practice by participating in a rectal ultrasound to find the heartbeat of Charlotte’s baby rhino fetus.Briasia and Diarra are two 11th graders taking part in the Zoo Academy, a program for high school juniors and seniors interested in biology, animal care and conservation. The students spend time working with animals and zookeepers. Both young women aspire to become veterinarians and were some of the first to have the chance to work with Charlotte.“I was taken aback. It scared me. I really thought it was a real rhino!,” Briasia said upon her initial experience with Charlotte.Diarra said: “They did an amazing job. Just touching it is … just wow!”By assisting natural breeding and through the use of artificial insemination, CREW has had success in birthing rhino calves and even brought rhinos back to their native land to contribute to the population.Ultrasound is the best way to assess [rhinoceros] fertility according to scientist Terri Roth, director of CREW. She’s credited with figuring out how to successfully breed Sumatran rhinos. Her research led to the births of three calves at the Cincinnati Zoo. There are fewer than 80 in the world.“Using serial ultrasound exams you can determine if the rhino is exhibiting normal reproductive activity (developing follicles on the ovary and ovulating regularly) and identify uterine pathology (cysts and tumors) which is not uncommon and can lead to infertility,” said Roth.In addition to detecting early pregnancy in rhinos, Charlotte is a way for students and zoo visitors to see firsthand how ultrasound technology is used to study reproduction and benefit the animals.Briasia described how the zookeepers can do invasive ultrasounds without using sedation, “basically by using a lot of food to train the rhino and teach her ‘it’s ok, we are helping you’ — it’s a good thing.”Diarra recounted hearing the heartbeat.“It was so calming and nice to hear. Like, wow, I really found this baby. She’s pregnant,” she said.The zoo made national headlines in 2017 by documenting the birth of a 6-month premature hippo named Fiona. Her survival became an international phenomenon and every successful milestone provided an opportunity to educate people about conservation and endangerment.The Black rhinoceros is a species native to Africa that grows 5 to 6 feet tall and weighs up to 3,000 pounds. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened species, the species is critically endangered, and at extremely high risk of extinction in the wild. These animals have been poached for their prominent horns, which are prized for ornamental decoration and used in Eastern medicine. Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

We must develop our HR back-office skills

first_imgWe must develop our HR back-office skillsOn 24 Aug 2004 in Personnel Today The NHS is a great example of the real role HR has to play in new-lookpublic services. The news profile on NHS HR director, Andrew Foster (10August), stated that it has a workforce of 1.3 million people, growing at arate of 60,000 per year. Assuming 8 per cent attrition, the NHS has to recruit164,000 new employees per year. If we assume conservatively, the NHS receives eightapplicants per vacancy, it has to process 1.3 million applications per year or6,300 each working day. The skills required to undertake such a high volume, transactional activityare not strategic or generalist. Back-office skills must be about customerservice (more a mindset than skill), process, technology, statistical analysis,compliance, consistency, accuracy and repeatability. The back office must beable to measure and understand demand to deploy adequate resources to servicethat demand. Have today’s HR professionals got those skills? I’m still not sure whether the Chartered Institute of Personnel andDevelopment’s teachings and qualifications really tackle much of the skills orthe culture required to turn HR into a function with a reputation for serviceexcellence and efficiency. But I am sure that we cannot keep churning out HRgeneralists with a little knowledge about a lot of things. The real test will lie in major public sector ref- orms,following Peter Gershon’s Review of Public SectorEfficiency. It states that savings of more than £20bn in six main areas acrossthe public sector in 2007-2008 have been identified. They include a plannedheadcount reduction, increased efficiency and making the best use of theresources available for the provision of services. One area under intensescrutiny will be the back office, which includes HR. Gershon states that back-office services provideessential support to the delivery of frontline services. But realistically,what does this mean, and how can it be achieved? The proposal is to effectivelycreate Ulrich’s three-box model – which defines how HR should be structured –with a corporate core that sets policy, an expert group to deliver theadded-value professional service, and a third group comprising transactionalsupport services. It is not a new model for HR in the private sector. To kick-start reformation in the public sector, and following the Gershon review, departmental programmes are in place tofocus on simplifying and standardising processes as a potential pre-requisiteto sharing or outsourcing services. Change programmes will also have toconcentrate on another important point raised by Gershon– ensuring the required skills are in place to achieve reformation at a locallevel will be paramount. Creating shared services and separating transactional activities fromstrategy to allow professionals to become HR business partners is a step in theright direction. But it will ultimately fail without developing the right skillsets and cultural mindset in the HR back office, where 80 per cent of resourcesreside. By Alan Bailey, head of businessprocess outsourcing, Xchanging Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Zoopla is now ‘more than just a digital noticeboard’ as it reveals big changes

first_imgHome » News » Marketing » Zoopla is now ‘more than just a digital noticeboard’ as it reveals big changes previous nextMarketingZoopla is now ‘more than just a digital noticeboard’ as it reveals big changesPortal has re-launched itself to estate agents with new products and a change in direction as sector competition hots up.Nigel Lewis28th January 202102,412 Views Zoopla has re-launched its business to estate agents to be ‘more than a digital noticeboard’ and instead play a greater role helping agents sell homes.The portal has wheeled out its big guns to promote the changes including CEO Charlie Bryant and COO Andy Marshall, both of whom say they mark a major shift in direction for Zoopla since it was bought by US investment firm Silver Lake for £2.2 billion.The pair say significant sums have been spent on developing new data-led tech as well as a recruitment drive that has more than tripled the size of its workforce.Bryant and Marshall say Zoopla’s new data and property software ‘ecosystem’ that will revolutionise the market for agents as well as for homeowners, including a drive to reduce the number of ‘tyre kicker’ leads agents receive.Zoopla is to give agents more flexibility in how they choose which extra services to pay for, enabling a more modular, pick-and-mix approach to its existing three-tier membership package.“In every meeting we’ve had with agents they’ve told us they want us to better understand consumers to create better leads that are more relevant to their business,” says Marshall (left).“And we’re doing that by getting home owners to interact with us earlier and for longer.”Major additions to its agent offering include a sales progression portal, a search platform that enable agents to match house hunters with properties, an enhanced listings toolkit, upgraded vendor prospecting and re-targeting functionality and ‘marketing team in a box’ service for traditional and digital activity.Zoopla is also launching a ‘my home’ service for the public, enabling them to store and capture all the information about their home including paperwork but also value and other data.“We know that homeowners are moving house less often, but our vision will drive market momentum and stimulate more activity. We will exert our influence on the market nationally and locally and drive demand directly to our customers,” says Bryant.Andy Marshall Zoopla Charlie Bryant Zoopla January 28, 2021Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more