Guyana honouring Caricom financial obligations

first_imgVice President and Foreign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge has confirmed that Guyana has honoured its financial obligations to the Caribbean Community (Caricom) even as the regional body continues to face some financial challenges while executing its mandate.The Minister said as a general observation, many countries within the Region have experienced financial difficulties in recent years. However, he noted, “Financial challenges faced by Caricom are not the result of failure by Guyana to make itsForeign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidgecontributions.”Greenidge also made it clear that Caricom has to redouble its efforts to cut wastage of resources, both financial and otherwise, in order to meet the demands of a changing global arena.The Minister said that funding for many regional projects were on the decline and Caricom Member States were experiencing their own financial challenges in order to keep up with the increasing number of meetings, forums and engagements that require their participation and input.He said that these engagements while necessary, as Caricom seeks to forge ahead with its one economic policy and space and Latin America reintegration initiative, Member States were expressing scepticism about the bill they may have to foot as the situation domestically with regard to finances remained grim.“As the international community takes up all sorts of new challenges, whether it be environment, global warming, new institutions are established…it sometimes require additional technicians, more money and it becomes increasingly burdensome for most countries,” he added.Asked whether he anticipates that Guyana may be called upon to pay a large financial contribution to Caricom in light of the massive oil finds and exploration activities here, the Foreign Affairs Minister responded in the negative, stating that he did not anticipate any such indication. He said, “I wouldn’t expect responsible Caricom Government to be demanding that you pay now in anticipation of revenues to appear in 2020 and beyond. We have always contributed to Caricom development in accordance with our capacity. And when Guyana was doing well financially and economically, Guyana went out of its way to lend support to the integration movement, both by ways of financing and this will continue when we have resources to do so.” Caricom has been facing many financial challenges since the 2008 economic crisis which shattered the economies of several of its Member States. While some have managed to rebound from the impact of the crisis, others have generally been unable to meet their financial obligations as far as contributing revenue to the bloc to keep its Georgetown-based Secretariat going.Although Caricom is one of the oldest integration schemes in the Western Hemisphere and the largest in terms of membership, it is by far the smallest in economic and geographic terms. Caribbean economies have either stagnated or grown very slowly, and high unemployment has become chronic. Despite important policy changes, export diversification has been limited for generating huge growth rates.Despite the challenges faced by the bloc, particularly the ravaging effects of the 2017 hurricane season which has cast a long shadow over the Region, the over US$2 billion pledged at the Caricom-United Nations conference for long-term recovery for hurricane-affected countries and the establishment of the regional renewable energy centre were among the successes recently recorded by Caricom.last_img read more

ICC Champions Trophy: Darren Lehmann wants ODIs to be more ‘liberal’ during rain delays

first_imgAustralia coach Darren Lehmann wants one-day international matches to continue as long as conditions are safe, even if not ideal, after back-to-back washouts left his team’s Champions Trophy campaign in complete disarray.The 50-over world champions are particularly upset after their second Group A match against Bangladesh was washed out on Monday just four overs short of what could have been a comfortable victory after having to split points with New Zealand in their tournament opener.Fear of rain looms large over Saturday’s do-or-die match against Ashes rivals England as well and Lehmann said administrators need to think more about the fans who expect a result.”I think we’ve just got to be more liberal to play some cricket. The fans want to see a result,” Lehmann said.”Especially this time of year in England, you can get (wet) weather. So it’s a case of if it’s not raining or it’s drizzling, we should just play.”He cited the example of Twenty20 cricket where matches continued in light rain.”My view is simple – play as much cricket as you can, where you possibly can,” said the 47-year-old.”You have to consider the safety of the players. That’s important and umpires and match referees take that into account.”But we’ve played games in the past, I can think of a T20 game in South Africa (in 2014) where we had sand or sawdust on the ground to play.”International Cricket Council’s influential Cricket Committee, of which Lehmann is a member, has had several discussions on rain delays but more needed to be done, said the former player.advertisement”Players and administrators have to move the game forward in the best way for the fans. Because we’ve got to grow the game.”Leg-spinner Adam Zampa has said Australia were looking at the match against England as a quarter-final contest and Lehmann suggested big-hitting batsman Chris Lynn could feature in the playing XI, possibly at the expense of all-rounder Moises Henriques.”He’ll come into contention again for the last game against England,” he said of the 25-year-old.”At the moment, with the make-up of our side, Zampa came in for (John) Hastings (after the first game) because we thought it would spin. He bowled very well.”But he’s a real chance to play, Lynn.”last_img read more