‘Turning Up’ the Beat

first_imgDetermined to constantly challenge himself and introduce a ground-breaking single before the competition gets any more competitive, Neoh William Kparsuah, famously known as Ne-oh William, is sky rocketing as a most ‘featured’ and hardworking artist.Because of that, he has been nominated in this year’s Liberian Music Awards as ‘Dancehall Artist of the Year against AK45, J-Youndy, Seek and Shadow.Ne-oh is one of a select handful of Liberian artists producing dance hall/reggae music. But as he points out, it really doesn’t matter – especially when he’s pumping out collaborations one after the other like he’s changing shoes. So far, his songs are bumping and catchy as heck; but Ne-oh just crossed the sea with his recent release featuring Quincy B, “Turn up”.On Tunes Liberia’s Top 10 music chart, “Turn Up” is at #3 after being released just one week ago!Ne-oh released five strong projects in 2015 and has released two this year already. So far he’s the most sought out by Liberian artists, who all want a piece of his immaculate ‘voice’ control on their tracks.Music is no longer a game on the Liberian entertainment scene and has now become a very competitive business. Therefore, a lot of artists are looking forward to riding on Ne-oh’s team –a team they say is winning all the spotlight right now.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Officials want pot sellers to pay tax

first_imgThe board ultimately decided that medical marijuana was not exempt from sales taxes because it was not dispensed by a pharmacist or approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a medication. “For the Board of Equalization, any tangible personal property not exempt from tax is subject to a sales tax,” board chairwoman Betty Yee said. The board’s action has divided the medical marijuana community, with some sellers saying it helps legitimize their businesses. But others worry that any tax information they report will be used against them by the federal government, which still bars use of medical marijuana. “It’s frustrating,” said Chris Moscone, an attorney who is representing the Hemp Center, a San Francisco medical marijuana dispensary that is negotiating with the board on back taxes. “There are basically two camps: those that want to be treated like legitimate businesses, and the other side, where they’re still rebels and don’t want to be taxed.” The applications for a seller’s permit do not require the retailer to disclose what he or she is selling, which would make it difficult for federal officials to track sales. SACRAMENTO – The taxman is going after the medical marijuana man. For the first time since California voters approved use of medical marijuana more than a decade ago, the state Board of Equalization is telling the estimated 150 to 200 medical marijuana retailers in California to pay sales taxes on pot. “If you sell medical marijuana, your sales in California are generally subject to tax, and you are required to hold a seller’s permit,” the board said in notices sent out in February. “If you do not obtain a seller’s permit or fail to report and pay the taxes due, you will be subject to interest and penalty charges.” Proposition 215, the 1996 initiative that decriminalized use of marijuana for medical purposes, did not address how state tax officials should deal with medical marijuana sales. The sales weren’t covered before Proposition215 because they were illegal. Kris Hermes, legal campaign director for Americans for Safe Access, a national medical marijuana advocacy group, said the board would get more medical marijuana dealers to come forward and pay taxes if it agreed not to go after back taxes. “If they started collecting taxes when they sign up for seller’s permits, that would reduce anxiety for many of these providers,” Hermes said. “And it would probably increase the level of participation in the state.” But Yee says that’s not an option, that the board has to treat all retailers the same. The board has the authority to collect taxes going back as many as eight years. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more