HEYS programme to be replaced

first_img…with a more holistic training programme targeting youthsFollowing a successful run, the Hinterland Employment and Youth Service (HEYS) initiative will be replaced with a more holistic training programme targeting youths across the country.This was according to Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Minister Sydney Allicock.According to the Department of Public Information (DPI), Minister Allicock explained that while the current HEYS initiative has accomplished much, it would be restructured to incorporate other training programmes for youths in the various sectors. This will be achieved through a collaboration between the Ministries of Education and Social Cohesion.Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Minister Sydney Allicock“This will be done to create a more holistic training package for youths throughout Guyana. Currently, the first cohort of the HEYS programme is being reviewed and from that information, we will be guided. The aim is to incorporate all the other programmes and to create an aggressive package for the youths in Guyana,” Minister Allicock explained.The Education Ministry has been tasked with developing a paper for the new programme. Additionally, the Green Enterprise Development Centre that will be established at Bina Hill, Region Nine (Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo), will further prepare Indigenous youths for the anticipated developments expected to accrue from the oil and gas sector.The flagship initiative is expected to serve 120 students from Regions One, Seven, Eight, Nine and Ten. The sum of $79 million has been allocated in the 2018 Budget to commence the construction of the facility.Some 1872 Indigenous youths received training through the Indigenous Peoples’ Affairs Ministry in a number of skilled areas.  Another 1958 youths are nearing completion of their training, making it a total of 3830 trained over a two-year period.The Government’s vision is to develop and implement a plan for a universalising programme of technical and vocational training, through the creation of skills training centres and programmes in every region.last_img read more

Jet set duet wows crowds

first_imgOver 100 different planes took part in the airshow. (Image:Musa Mkalipi) South African Mzansi Ballet dancers perform while a Mango Boeing 737-800 flies over. (Image:Mango) MEDIA CONTACTS • Hein Keiser  Mango Corporate Affairs  +27 82 520 0555 RELATED ARTICLES • Air show gives wings to young dreams • Ninety years on golden wings • SA air school, Boeing in unique deal • South African art • SAAF: working in war and peaceMusa Mkalipi An unprecedented collaboration between low-cost airline Mango and Johannesburg-based South African Mzansi Ballet took place at the annual South African Air Force (SAAF) Museum air show, held at Air Force Base Swartkops on May 11.The performance saw a gigantic Mango Boeing 737-800, flown by Captain Scully Levin and Chief Pilot Quentin Mouton, synchronising its movements in the air with those of graceful ballet dancers on the ground. The dancers were dressed in the bright orange of the Mango livery. The audience of 35 000 was the largest yet for a ballet performance in Africa.The performance was precisely choreographed and although it was just seven minutes long, it was one of the most important for the company, said Mzansi Ballet CEO Dirk Badenhorst.“It is very important in terms of funding to find creative and innovative ways to place ourselves in a space where different people can experience us, and break the stigma that ballet is only for theatres,” he said, adding that by partnering with Mango, the company had been able to create the performance of a lifetime.Preparation for the show took about three weeks. Hein Kaiser from Mango Corporate Affairs said that Captain Levin worked out a routine, from which the choreography was created. “We wanted to make it really special and we wanted people to work with us on a deeper level.”Award-winning dancer Kitty Phetla had been looking forward to the showcase. “This will also give us a chance to show people what we as a dance company can do,” she said.The relationship between Mango and South African Mzansi Ballet started three years ago, and now the airline flies the company’s dancers all over South Africa.Mango also hosted a career expo for some 3 000 pupils, with 30 exhibitors within the sector teaching the children about aviation.  It was the airline’s fourth such event – Mango launched its career and job shadow programme in Athlone, Western Cape earlier this year.South African Air Force Museum The South African Air Force Museum celebrated 40 years in 2013, and this was the theme for the event. This year’s edition was the first to be held under the recently established joint command that includes Air Force Base Swartkops, the SAAF Mobile Deployment Wing and  the former Air Force Gymnasium, which is now home to the Siyandiza youth aviation awareness initiative and the air force’s cookery school.About 100 planes, both military and civilian, flew on the day. The show featured a line-up of modern as well as vintage aircraft such as a Cheetah, an Impala, two Vampires, and Tiger Moths, among others.The Silver Falcons were the only military planes participating. They are the SAAF’s official aerobatic team, but will not be seen again this year because of budget cuts.The SAAF Museum air show won the award for best South African air show in 2011 and 2012. This accolade is handed out by the Aero Club of South Africa, a composite body representing all sectors of sport, recreational and private aviation.Lt Col Clive Shepherd of the South African Air Force Museum said the institution considers itself lucky to have people from Mango associated closely with it; these include pilots who have kept up a good relationship between the airline and the museum. Some Mango pilots are associated with the Harvard Club of South Africa, which flies and maintains vintage Harvards.  Shepherd said that the show received sponsorship  from Time Aviation, the exclusive representative for Bombardier Business Aircraft in Africa, which made a contribution of R75 000 (US$8 000), as well as defence and aerospace firm Paramount Group, which donated R175 000 ($19 000) towards fuel for the aircraft.“We have been fortunate now to have an air show for the last five years,” he said. “We have had air shows before but they were stopped for several years. We are hoping for a bigger and better one in the future.” Blurb: Dance and engineering came together at the 2013 South African Air Force Museum’s annual air show, which saw an unusual collaboration between low-cost airline Mango and South African Mzansi Ballet.Musa Mkalipi16 May 2013An unprecedented collaboration between low-cost airline Mango and Johannesburg-based South African Mzansi Ballet took place at the annual South African Air Force (SAAF) Museum air show, held at Air Force Base Swartkops on May 11.The performance saw a gigantic Mango Boeing 737-800, flown by Captain Scully Levin, synchronising its movements in the air with those of graceful ballet dancers on the ground. The dancers were dressed in the bright orange of the Mango livery. The audience of 35 000 was the largest yet for a ballet performance in Africa.The performance was precisely choreographed and although it was just seven minutes long, it was one of the most important for the company, said Mzansi Ballet CEO Dirk Badenhorst.“It is very important in terms of funding to find creative and innovative ways to place ourselves in a space where different people can experience us, and break the stigma that ballet is only for theatres,” he said, adding that by partnering with Mango, the company had been able to create the performance of a lifetime.Preparation for the show took about three weeks. Hein Kaiser from Mango Corporate Affairs said that Captain Levin worked out a routine, from which the choreography was created. “We wanted to make it really special and we wanted people to work with us on a deeper level.”Award-winning dancer Kitty Phetla had been looking forward to the showcase. “This will also give us a chance to show people what we as a dance company can do,” she said.The relationship between Mango and South African Mzansi Ballet started three years ago, and now the airline flies the company’s dancers all over South Africa.Mango also hosted a career expo for some 3 000 pupils, with 30 exhibitors within the sector teaching the children about aviation.  It was the airline’s fourth such event – Mango launched its career and job shadow programme in Athlone, Western Cape earlier this year.South African Air Force Museum The South African Air Force Museum celebrated 40 years in 2013, and this was the theme for the event. This year’s edition was the first to be held under the recently established joint command that includes Air Force Base Swartkops, the SAAF Mobile Deployment Wing and  the former Air Force Gymnasium, which is now home to the Siyandiza youth aviation awareness initiative and the air force’s cookery school.About 100 planes, both military and civilian, flew on the day. The show featured a line-up of modern as well as vintage aircraft such as a Cheetah, an Impala, two Vampires, and Tiger Moths, among others.The Silver Falcons were the only military planes participating. They are the SAAF’s official aerobatic team, but will not be seen again this year because of budget cuts.The SAAF Museum air show won the award for best South African air show in 2011 and 2012. This accolade is handed out by the Aero Club of South Africa, a composite body representing all sectors of sport, recreational and private aviation.Lt Col Clive Shepherd of the South African Air Force Museum  said the institution considers itself lucky to have people from Mango associated closely with it; these include pilots who have kept up a good relationship between the airline and the museum. Some Mango pilots are associated with the Harvard Club of South Africa, which flies and maintains vintage Harvards.  Shepherd said that the show received sponsorship  from Time Aviation, the exclusive representative for Bombardier Business Aircraft in Africa, which made a contribution of R75 000 (US$8 000), as well as defence and aerospace firm Paramount Group, which donated R175 000 ($19 000) towards fuel for the aircraft.“We have been fortunate now to have an air show for the last five years,” he said. “We have had air shows before but they were stopped for several years. We are hoping for a bigger and better one in the future.”last_img read more

Invisibility: The Secret to Editing and Shooting an Interview

first_imgHere’s how you can avoid disrupting the flow of your interview edit — as well as how to avoid jarring camera angles during the shoot.Top image via Netflix.One of the most challenging tasks for video content creators is shooting, editing, and producing interviews. Not for any artistically challenging reason, but because of how boring and clean-cut they are by nature. Of all the camera tricks, lighting hacks, and editing flourishes we can add to them, interviews need to follow a strict set of visual and auditory rules, even if we’re not sure what those rules are. In Thomas Flight’s latest editing breakdown, we look at David Letterman’s latest interview show and how the editing and camerawork distract the viewer from the central theme of the show: the guests’ stories. Too Many Camera AnglesImage via Thomas Flight.The show in question demonstrates how shots can be intrusive and alienating during what is supposed to be an intimate sit-down interview. While it may be easy to point to the show’s obviously massive budget, or Netflix doing things the way they usually do (disrupting the medium), the excessive camera angles prove a bit much. The show weaves in and out of clips from the interviewee’s life, so the excuse for an energy boost doesn’t work. Flight points out in the video that traditional talk show interviews (even if you don’t want to call this a talk show, it’s a talk show) only use about 3-4 different shot angles.In an interview the information we’re interested in [is] simply what the guest and the host are saying, both verbally and non-verbally. The sooner the cinematography becomes invisible, the better we can focus on the communication.Keep it simple. Keep it sweet. Again, nobody is here to watch your interview for its outstanding cinematography and natural lighting that showcases the left side and eye color of your artist’s seemingly profound, weathered face. They’re here to listen to your subjects and the stories they have to tell — all while living in that moment for as long as you allow them to.Longer CutsImage via Thomas Flight.As Flight puts it, the number of shots you use almost doesn’t matter — if you give each shot enough time to breathe. Letterman’s new show is a perfect example of how too much editing can be a bad thing. The image you see above comes from the first part of a tidbit featuring President Barack Obama that, for-whatever reason, is cut up into six different shots that all last about four seconds each. The beauty of talk shows and long-form interviews is the length of each shot. If the interviewee is telling a story or recalling past thoughts, the eyes lock in on the subject if the edit and the camera lets them. That is literally how you create engagement with your audience. Bouncing back and forth like a basketball is a good example of trying to add life when the life already exists.Image via Thomas Flight. There also an example from Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee during which Obama is sitting in a car with Jerry Seinfeld telling a joke, and the edit itself tells a story in relation to the structure of what the subject is saying, moving from left to right.The lesson to take from this editing analysis is that it’s okay to leave the interview alone in the edit. Concentrate more on the questions, making the interviewee comfortable and creating an engrossing story. Don’t worry so much about the look of your shot or entertaining the viewers — the story should do that.Looking for more information on interviews? Check out these articles.5 Essential Tips for Editing Professional Interview SoundbitesProduction Tips: Making Interviewees Comfortable Interview Tips Ever Documentary Filmmaker Should Knowlast_img read more

Kiwis confirm participation in CWG

first_imgAfter days of indecision, the New Zealand Olympic Committee on Friday confirmed participation in the Delhi Commonwealth Games after seeing positive steps being taken by the organisers to improve the situation.New Zealand Olympic Committee board gave its nod for the planned departures from September 28 after being briefed by NZOC President Mike Stanley and Secretary General Barry Maister, who were in Delhi to take stock of the situation.Staneley said the situation was grim but it has started changing following intervention by the state and the central governments.”We remain hopeful that things can be turned around. What we found was inexcusable and unacceptable but we’ve seen a change in leadership and this is positive,” Stanley said at a press conference in Auckland.The build-up to the Games has been marred by a lot of problems including construction delays, bad conditions at the Games Village, collapse of an overbridge near the main venue Jawaharlal Nehru stadium and an attack on a tourist bus.It led several Commonwealth nations including New Zealand to put on hold the departure of their teams for the Games, which Stanley said was a wise decision.”Working with sports to delay the arrivals of the first athletes has also been the right decision and we appreciate everyone’s flexibility,” Stanley said.The board also agreed that athletes will be advised to stay within the security ‘bubble’ during the games and that the situation will continue to be monitored by the team in New Delhi.last_img read more

Newlyweds Ranveer, Deepika welcomed in Mumbai by sea of fans

first_imgMumbai, Nov 18 (IANS) A sea of fans, camera flashes and loud cheers welcomed Bollywood’s newlywed couple Ranveer Singh and Deepika Padukone to Mumbai on Sunday morning after their dreamy wedding at the picturesque Lake Como in Italy. The much-in-love duo, smiling ear-to-ear, waved out at the fans and paparazzi, expressing gratitude with folded hands.Ranveer and Deepika arrived at the Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport where several fans waited to catch a glimpse.Deepika wore a straight-cut beige suit with traditional red Banarasi dupatta, with sindoor on her forehead, henna on her hands and traditional red ‘chooda’ (bangles) on her wrists. Ranveer sported a matching kurta-pyjama with a pink Nehru jacket. Ranveer had his protective arm around Deepika throughout the walk from the exit to the car. Both of them opted for round sunglasses to complete their look.Ranveer is already a protective and doting husband, as he was seen fencing his wife Deepika from eager fans at the airport. As soon as they came out of the airport, several fans grabbed the opportunity to get a picture clicked with them. Although they looked visibly tired, Deepika and Ranveer obliged their admirers and happily posed for the cameras.The couple got married twice, in Konkani and North Indian rituals. The Konkani wedding took place on November 14 and the North Indian wedding happened on November 15.After their wedding, both stars posted pictures of their wedding on their social media accounts and captioned it with heart emoji.Ranveer and Deepika will host their wedding reception in Bengaluru on November 21 and in Mumbai on November 28. In Mumbai, they will have another celebration for the film fraternity on December 1.The couple was dating for over 6 years before they solemnised their relationship earlier this week. While they kept a no-phone policy for the guests in attendance, both Deepika and Ranveer treated fans to the two wedding photographs.On the work front, Ranveer Singh next will be seen in Rohit Shetty’s “Simmba” and Deepika will play real life character of acid attack survivor Laxmi Agarwal in Meghna Gulzar’s directorial venture.advertisement–IANSiv/sim/rb/mrlast_img read more

Prime Minister Says Travellers Expect More for Their Money

first_img Mr. Holness suggested that countries should start placing emphasis on “how we market our destination and on finding new markets”. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says travellers today are a lot more sophisticated and are expecting more for their tourism dollars.Mr. Holness, who was giving the keynote address at the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) Global Conference on Jobs and Inclusive Growth at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James on November 28, added that tourism-dependent countries should wake up to that reality.“There has been somewhat of a revolution in travel in terms of how people book, places they want to stay, and what they want to experience,” he noted.“We are very cognisant of this and understand that we must also change. Travel facilitation is at the core of developing tourism and unlocking its socio-economic benefits,” the Prime Minister argued.Mr. Holness suggested that countries should start placing emphasis on “how we market our destination and on finding new markets”.“Recently, Jamaica has been placing renewed emphasis on revitalising some markets and on introducing new direct airlifts, such as from Poland,” he pointed out.“In fact, Jamaica recorded a phenomenal 91.3 per cent increase in stopover visitor arrivals from the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB)-defined Southern and Western Europe region for the month of September 2017, over the same period last year,” Mr. Holness noted.He reported that for the 10 months of 2017, there was a seven per cent increase in stopover arrivals in comparison to the corresponding period for 2016.The Prime Minister also noted that cruise passenger arrivals were up 12.7 per cent for January to October, and that from a total of 3,394,472 visitors in that ten-month period, Jamaica earned US$2.332 billion or 10.2 per cent more in gross foreign exchange earnings than the US$2.115 billion earned last year over the same period.“In addition to increasing airlift capacity and new destinations, we are also looking at our infrastructure in terms of ease of access throughout the island,” Mr. Holness said.The Prime Minister cited road improvement, including the Montego Bay bypass; revitalisation of Ocho Rios is planned; and $1.9 million has been earmarked for the redevelopment of the boardwalk/promenade from the marina to Ocho Rios Bay Beach, and the upgrade of Main Street.He said that as part of an overall strategy, there will be better organisation of traffic management in the cruise-ship areas, so that passengers can leave the ship and the port in a more structured manner.Mr. Holness added that an artisan village is planned for Falmouth in Trelawny, which will offer space for craft vendors.“The Government continues to take concrete steps to expand our tourism product and to create more opportunities that will improve the livelihood of Jamaicans,” he said. The Prime Minister also noted that cruise passenger arrivals were up 12.7 per cent for January to October, and that from a total of 3,394,472 visitors in that ten-month period, Jamaica earned US$2.332 billion or 10.2 per cent more in gross foreign exchange earnings than the US$2.115 billion earned last year over the same period. Story Highlights Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says travellers today are a lot more sophisticated and are expecting more for their tourism dollars.last_img read more