Fudadin eyes 1,000 runs, five centuries

first_img “When I began this competition, my goal was 1,000 runs and five centuries. With six matches to go, I still believe that is possible, but the way we (Jaguars) are beating teams by an innings will make that goal harder,” Fudadin said with a chuckle during an interview with Kaieteur News. “But I can’t do it on my own; it has to be the will of God.” Starting the final day on 52 for two, requiring a further 213 to make the visitors bat again, Red Force battled to 136 for two before suffering a sensational collapse to be bowled out for 216. Jaguars have now vaulted clear at the top of the standings on 70 points after four straight victories. “It feels good to get a hundred after so long. Alhamdulillah …. without God nothing is possible,” said Fudadin, a devout Muslim who played Test cricket in 2012. “I have been working hard on my game. I was batting well for a long time but not spending enough time at the crease to build big scores. I never doubted my ability to bat. It was not a technical problem but more of a mental one.” The talented left-hander has struggled to get starts in this season’s tournament with scores of four and zero in the first round, five in the second round and nine in the first innings of the third round. However, he found some form and confidence in the second innings against Barbados when he made 42. “I did not spend much time at the crease in my previous innings in this tournament because I did not manage too many runs,” said Fudadin, whose 102 was his first century since scoring 103 for West Indies ‘A’ against Sri Lanka ‘A’ October last year in Sri Lanka. “In addition to perseverance, patience and self-belief, having a supporting family helps. My wife (Akeema) and friends are always there for me.” PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC): Opener Assad Fudadin says Guyana Jaguars’ rampage through the WICB Professional Cricket League (PCL) after four rounds may prevent him from achieving his goals in the regional tournament this season. Fudadin has set a goal of 1,000 runs, including five centuries for the season, but says the Jaguars’ lopsided victories in the tournament are making it impossible for him to attain such a feat. Fudadin scored 102, his fifth first-class century, to help Jaguars to a massive innings and 49-run victory over Trinidad and Tobago Red Force at the Queen’s Park oval on Monday. HARDER GOALlast_img read more

Chelsea Ladies through to semi-final

first_imgChelsea Ladies reached the semi-finals of the Women’s FA Cup with a fine 3-1 win at Manchester City.Laura Coombs, Eniola Aluko and Katie Chapman scored as Emma Hayes’ side maintained their unbeaten start to the season.Coombs netted the opener after seven minutes, firing home after being set up by Jackie Groenen.City levelled when Toni Duggan scored from the penalty spot after Chapman fouled Jill Scott, but Chelsea’s lead was restored when Aluko beat two players and finished coolly.Chapman made it 3-1 just before the hour mark with a header from the outstanding Yuki Ogimi’s cross.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

High drama at the Midmar Mile

first_img12 February 2007There was high drama at the world’s largest open water swimming event on Sunday when the final race, for boys and men aged 14 to 30, was cancelled due to bad weather – the first time in the Midmar Mile’s 34-year history that a race has been called off.Raced over two days, with four races each day, conditions for the Midmar Mile on Saturday were scorching, with the temperatures in the mid-thirties before the discomfort index was taken into consideration. On Sunday, it was a different story altogether.It rained throughout Saturday evening and into the new day. A light sprinkling of rain fell consistently through Sunday’s first race, the girl’s 13 and under and women’s 31 and older. During event two, the boy’s and men’s equivalent, conditions were much the same.By the third race, the women’s 14 to 30 year age group, the rain became heavier and the winds rose, bringing with them a biting cold.Shocked facesThen came an announcement from race organiser Wayne Riddin that only seeded swimmers would be allowed to contest the final race. There were plenty of shocked faces as it filtered through. Shortly afterwards the decision to cancel the race entirely followed.Within minutes it became clear why Riddin pulled the plug as the winds drove from south to north across the west to east course, causing choppy and sizeable waves to form, with a whispery mist blanketing the dam.It was a disappointing conclusion to the weekend, but the primary priority for the organisers is the safety of the competitors and Riddin felt that it couldn’t be guaranteed, thus his decision, which he reckoned was easy to make given the circumstances.For defending champion Troyden Prinsloo, who had flown out from the University of Georgia to attempt to become the first male swimmer to win the Midmar Mile three years in succession, it was a terrible blow. Prinsloo said he would have swum no matter the conditions – but he’s a world class swimmer, unlike the majority of the field.Hungarian successesThe cancellation of the race also brought to an end the ambitions of the Hungarian national open water swimming team, who had enjoyed a fine day, taking victories in the boy’s and girl’s 13 and under categories, as well as in the women’s 31 to 40 age groupA number of the Hungarians, though, will get the opportunity to swim at Midmar Dam, with the holding of the 10-kilometre open water swim on Monday.Hungarian coach Tamas Vadjda validated Riddin’s decision, saying he realised “safety was the first concern”.Open women’s raceIn the open women’s event, victory went to Australia’s Melissa Gorman, who won her ticket to the Midmar Mile by clinching the Gold Coast Mile Down Under. It was a tight race.Through the first three hot spots, at 400 metres, 800 metres, and 1 200 metres, South African international Melissa Corfe led, chased by Gorman and three-time defending champion Keri-Ann Payne of Great Britain.Gorman, though, had chosen the best line into the finish and she crossed the finish line in 19 minutes and 52 seconds, well off the record of 18 minutes and 21 seconds set by Payne in 2006. However, considering the choppy conditions and a testing headwind, it was a fine effort.Corfe followed in second position in just over 20 minutes, with the defending champion relegated to third spot.The Eight-Mile ClubEfforts on behalf of charities were extremely successful. Members of the Eight-Mile Club were responsible for raising over R700 000 and that figure is one that was calculated before the final day’s events.The swimmers taking part in the Eight-Mile Club swim each and every race whilst raising funds for a wide number of charities. Fourteen-year-old Myles Brown was astonishingly successful in both the races and in raising money. In seven races, he was first across the finish line on four occasions, and he also brought in R24 000.Olympic silver medal winner and Deaflympics star Terence Parkin was rather less fortunate. He suffered a bite from a spider and gritted his way through Saturday’s four races. However, that evening he had to be rushed to hospital as a result of the bite. A substitute swimmer, Andrew Campbell, took Parkin’s place to continue raising money for the Fulton School for the Deaf.According to Riddin, this year’s entry was in the region of 16 500 swimmers, although other figures provided lift that number to anywhere from 16 700 to 17 000. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

It’s a Barty party: Australian wins 1st major at French Open

first_imgThat last part is an apt description of how she approaches each point, looking for just the right angle or speed, understanding where an opponent might be most vulnerable at any given moment. After using her slice backhand, topspin forehand and kick serve to do just that to Vondrousova, she called it a “kind of ‘Ash Barty brand’ of tennis.”Vondrousova’s take?“She’s mixing things up. And she has a huge serve,” Vondrousova said. “So it’s all, like, very tough to play against.”Barty raced to a 4-0 lead and then held on, showing that she learned her lesson after blowing a 5-0 edge in the opening set of her quarterfinal victory a day earlier against another unseeded teenager, 17-year-old American Amanda Anisimova.“An absolute roller-coaster,” Barty called it.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:44Djokovic wins Laureus Sportsman of Year Award02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Australia’s Ashleigh Barty kisses the trophy as she celebrates winning her women’s final match of the French Open tennis tournament against Marketa Vondrousova of the Czech Republic in two sets 6-1, 6-3, at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Saturday, June 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)PARIS (AP) — Ash Barty knew she needed a break from tennis, from the pressure and expectations, from the week-in, week-out grind. So she stepped away in 2014 and wound up trying her hand at cricket, joining a professional team at home in Australia.After almost two years away, Barty was pulled back to the tour. Good choice. Now she’s a Grand Slam champion.ADVERTISEMENT ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too LATEST STORIES Taking control right from the start of the French Open final and never really letting go, the No. 8-seeded Barty capped a quick-as-can-be rise in her return to the sport by beating unseeded 19-year-old Marketa Vondrousova of the Czech Republic 6-1, 6-3 Saturday for her first major championship. DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. No Garden upset: Golovkin knocks out Rolls in 4th roundcenter_img Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue View comments “I never closed any doors, saying, ‘I’m never playing tennis again.’ For me, I needed time to step away, to live a normal life because this tennis life certainly isn’t normal. I think I needed time to grow as a person, to mature,” Barty said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsAnd as for why she came back three years ago?“I missed the competition. I missed the 1-on-1 battle, the ebbs and the flows, the emotions you get from winning and losing matches,” said Barty, who will jump to a career-best No. 2 in the rankings Monday behind Naomi Osaka. “They are so unique and you can only get them when you’re playing and when you put yourself out on the line and when you become vulnerable and try and do things that no one thinks of.” After the U.S. Open five years ago, Barty left competitive tennis. She had been a successful junior, winning the 2011 Wimbledon girls’ title, and played in three doubles finals by then, too.But she needed to get away and reconsider how to approach her job and all that came with it.Look where she is now.“If she didn’t take a break, I’m not sure she’d still be playing. So I think the time away was the best thing for her,” Tyzzer said. “She got her head around that this is what she missed and this is what she wanted to do.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess MOST READ Her coach, Craig Tyzzer, said the two of them huddled with Ben Crowe, who helps Barty with the mental side of things, and they had a “really good discussion about it” to make sure she’d avoid that sort of trouble in the final.Neither Barty, 23, nor Vondrousova had ever played in a Grand Slam final before. Neither had even been in a major semifinal until this week, either. But it was only Vondrousova who seemed jittery at the outset; she was playing at Court Philippe Chatrier for the first time.Barty wound up with a 27-10 edge in winners to become the first Australian to win the trophy at Roland Garros since Margaret Court in 1973.“I played the perfect match today,” Barty said.Pretty close to it, particularly at the beginning. By the end, Barty compiled a 27-10 edge in winners.It took all of 70 minutes to wrap things up.“She gave me a lesson today,” said Vondrousova, who is ranked 38th. “I didn’t really feel good today, because she didn’t let me play my game.”The women’s final started about 1½ hours later than scheduled because it followed the resumption of Dominic Thiem’s 6-2, 3-6, 7-5, 5-7, 7-5 victory over Novak Djokovic in the men’s semifinals, a match suspended Friday evening because of rain.Thiem will face 11-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal on Sunday in a rematch of last year’s final.In a women’s draw filled with surprises, Barty faced only one seeded player, No. 14 Madison Keys of the U.S., along with the women who eliminated Serena Williams and defending champion Simona Halep.last_img read more