Big Walker Cup semis at Constant Spring

first_imgFirst-time Walker Cup semi-finalists, Haile Selassie High, will look to continue their Cinderella run when they face Jamaica College (JC) in the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA)/FLOW knockout competition at Constant Spring Complex today. Kick-off time is 3 p.m. The game is one of a double-header, with the opener featuring Kingston College (KC) and Bridgeport High, set to start at 1 p.m. Geoffrey Maxwell has been creating waves with Haile Selassie and after an impressive performance in which they beat Excelsior High 6-5 in a penalty shootout last Saturday, he is confident of beating another traditional top schoolboy team. “It is going to be a very competitive game. I have a fair idea of what to expect from JC. We have to play our game and counter them,” Maxwell told The Gleaner yesterday. “They know what they can achieve, and we are pretty confident that we can win the game and advance to the final,” added the former Jamaica player and coach. Haile Selassie’s top players include captain Ricardo Phipps, Akeem Grandison, Hamish Smith and Chase Knight. Miguel Coley, JC’s head coach, said Haile Selassie is a dangerous team. “They (Haile Selassie) have been playing good football, so we are looking forward to a tough game tomorrow,” Coley said. “It is a semi-final game so the winner will go to the final. We are ready for anything,” he also said. JC will rely on captain Oquin Robinson, Ronaldo Brown, Donovan Dawkins, Maliek Howell and Duhaney Williams. In the first game, red-hot KC are fancied to get the better of Bridgeport. Under the guidance of Ludlow Bernard, KC have been scoring heavily this season, so they have enough firepower to push Bridgeport on the back foot and take the game. The KC key players include Rashawn Mackison, Travonne Reid and Fabian Grant. Bridgeport, on the other hand, have a young team that could create a huge upset on the day.last_img read more

Officials want pot sellers to pay tax

first_imgThe board ultimately decided that medical marijuana was not exempt from sales taxes because it was not dispensed by a pharmacist or approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a medication. “For the Board of Equalization, any tangible personal property not exempt from tax is subject to a sales tax,” board chairwoman Betty Yee said. The board’s action has divided the medical marijuana community, with some sellers saying it helps legitimize their businesses. But others worry that any tax information they report will be used against them by the federal government, which still bars use of medical marijuana. “It’s frustrating,” said Chris Moscone, an attorney who is representing the Hemp Center, a San Francisco medical marijuana dispensary that is negotiating with the board on back taxes. “There are basically two camps: those that want to be treated like legitimate businesses, and the other side, where they’re still rebels and don’t want to be taxed.” The applications for a seller’s permit do not require the retailer to disclose what he or she is selling, which would make it difficult for federal officials to track sales. SACRAMENTO – The taxman is going after the medical marijuana man. For the first time since California voters approved use of medical marijuana more than a decade ago, the state Board of Equalization is telling the estimated 150 to 200 medical marijuana retailers in California to pay sales taxes on pot. “If you sell medical marijuana, your sales in California are generally subject to tax, and you are required to hold a seller’s permit,” the board said in notices sent out in February. “If you do not obtain a seller’s permit or fail to report and pay the taxes due, you will be subject to interest and penalty charges.” Proposition 215, the 1996 initiative that decriminalized use of marijuana for medical purposes, did not address how state tax officials should deal with medical marijuana sales. The sales weren’t covered before Proposition215 because they were illegal. Kris Hermes, legal campaign director for Americans for Safe Access, a national medical marijuana advocacy group, said the board would get more medical marijuana dealers to come forward and pay taxes if it agreed not to go after back taxes. “If they started collecting taxes when they sign up for seller’s permits, that would reduce anxiety for many of these providers,” Hermes said. “And it would probably increase the level of participation in the state.” But Yee says that’s not an option, that the board has to treat all retailers the same. The board has the authority to collect taxes going back as many as eight years. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more