Robinson not losing sleep over Pirates’ 28 turnovers

first_imgHow to help the Taal evacuees Not that Robinson was looking for faults in Perez’ game.The soft-spoken mentor knows that turnovers are an inevitable part of his team’s game given the Pirates’ fast-paced system. What counts is how they make up for those miscues.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“The thing about our team is we’re allowed to make mistakes. It’s not a sin to turn the ball over because you know that they really didn’t mean to turn the ball over,” said Robinson.“What’s important is how you get back after that turnover. I guess that’s very important to our team. So you just have to trust them that they’re gonna make mistakes and they’ll be responsible to make up for those mistakes later on.” Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up MOST READ Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson LATEST STORIES Christian Standhardinger piques interest of teams ahead of PBA draft Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Robinson has already accepted that more miscues will be coming Lyceum’s way, and a lot of which may come from his leaders like Perez. But the only way to negate that is to keep his wards prepared for everything that will be thrown at them.“We’ll work on the things that we have control of which is our preparation, on how we’re gonna cover our mistakes,” he said. “We wanna focus all of our energy to us, on how we’re gonna keep on growing, how we’re gonna keep on improving. That’s the good thing about committing mistakes: there’s always room for correction and always room for growth.” In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson That mindset has been ingrained in the Pirates with Robinson trusting his players to make the right decisions, and it has worked wonders so far as they tout an immaculate 15-0 record this NCAA Season 93.“I just remind them of things, but I’m not gonna get mad at them. I played and I know the feeling if there’s so much pressure, but again, there’s no such thing as a perfect game. So we just let them be. They’re committing mistakes, but then again, I can trust them that they will always fight back and make up for those,” he said.The Pirates committed 28 turnovers in the game against the Golden Stags, no doubt a high mark for any team seeking to contend for a title.But Lyceum did not let San Sebastian take advantage of those, forcing the latter to commit 27 turnovers and holding them to a measly 34-percent clip from the field.Three wins away from completing the unprecedented 18-0 sweep in the elimination phase, the Pirates brace for the toughest stretch yet as they close their schedule with games against Letran, Jose Rizal U, and San Beda.ADVERTISEMENT Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netCJ Perez may have gotten his career-best in scoring, but it was his six turnovers that caught coach Topex Robinson’s attention.“Career-high in turnovers, too?,” the mentor quipped after Lyceum’s 78-73 win over San Sebastian on Friday where his prized ward dropped 28 points along with 10 rebounds against his six turnovers.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award DAY6 is for everybody View commentslast_img read more

Fifa guarantees press freedom

first_img(Image: stock.xchng)MEDIA CONTACTS • Femida MehtarExecutive directorSA National Editors’ Forum+27 11 484 3630+27 11 484 3617+27 84 784 2006director@sanef.org.za• Wolfgang EichlerFifa media officer+27 11 567 2010+27 83 2010 471media-sa@fifa.org• Delia FischerFifa media officer+27 11 567 2010+27 11 567 2524+27 83 201 0470media-sa@fifa.orgMary AlexanderWorld football body Fifa has reassured the South African and international media that the purpose of its terms and conditions for accreditation for reporting on the 2010 World Cup “is not, and has never been, to restrict press freedom”.In a statement issued on 1 February, Fifa said: “The purpose of the media accreditation terms and conditions is to regulate the behaviour of people entering the 2010 Fifa World Cup venues, first and foremost to ensure the safety of everyone in those venues.”This follows growing media concerns over Fifa’s conditions, expressed mainly by the South African Media Interest Group (Samig), which is made up of members of the South African National Editors’ Forum (Sanef) and industry body Print Media South Africa. According to The Media Online, the main points of contention are:Newspapers will not be able to push pictures on to their mobile platforms (they can, however, push text).There are restrictions on newspapers doing video packages for their websites.Reporters will not be able to report on the names of hotels in which the teams are staying.No newspapers will be able to sell papers within the restricted zone around stadiums, which has a radius of about 800 metres.Although Fifa commits itself to guaranteeing freedom of expression, there is also a clause that says that news organisations may not bring Fifa into disrepute.Many of the terms and conditions apply to reporters and photographers and their “organisations” (suggesting their colleagues, some of whom will not be covering the World Cup) rather than “employer” (their editors).The dispute intensified last week, with three major South African news organisations – Avusa, Media24 and Independent Newspapers – appointing law firm Webber Wentzel to “engage in a constructive way” with Fifa over the accreditation terms and conditions.Although there was no threat of legal action, Dario Milo, of law firm Webber Wentzel said at the time that the media houses believed the terms and conditions “unjustifiably limit media freedom”.“The particular provisions that our clients take issue with are those that empower Fifa to unilaterally withdraw the accreditation of any journalist or unilaterally change the conditions, and also provisions which restrict reportage where, in Fifa’s view, this may harm the reputation of the Fifa World Cup,” he said.On Monday Fifa attorneys sent Webber Wentzel a written assurance that it was not seeking to restrict press freedom, and issued a media release to back it up. On the same day, Samig held a meeting with Sanef, other media industry bodies and Larry Kilman from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).“Fifa would like to make it clear that it does respect the freedom of the press,” Fifa said in the statement. “Editorial independence in the coverage of the Fifa World Cup is guaranteed and this principle is enshrined in Article 1 of the terms and conditions, the second paragraph of which states as follows:“‘For the avoidance of doubt, nothing in the terms and conditions is intended to be, or shall be interpreted as restricting or undermining the editorial independence or freedom to report and comment of Accredited Parties.’“This is an overall principle and, as the wording implies, the terms which are the cause of the complaint must always be read bearing this principle in mind.”Fifa concluded by pointing out that there had been no restrictions to press freedom during the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup, held as a dry-run for the 2010 event.“There were no complaints regarding press freedom on that occasion and there is no instance of Fifa have abused the provision to restrict press freedom,” Fifa said. Full text of the Fifa statement:We have had joint consultations with the key stakeholders from the international press, including WAN (World Association of Newspapers) and AIPS (Association Internationale de la Presse Sportive, or International Sports Press Association), during the drafting process of the terms and conditions and we have incorporated into the terms and conditions some of the suggestions that they have made. We have also had meetings with Sanef and with other representatives of the South African media. The contacts with WAN, AIPS and other media stakeholders have been very fruitful during the past years and we even have a standing media committee at Fifa which includes representatives of AIPS, WAN, individual journalists and photographers as well representatives from each Confederation. The purpose of the media accreditation terms and conditions is to regulate the behaviour of people entering the 2010 Fifa World Cup venues, first and foremost to ensure the safety of everyone in those venues. The purpose is not, and has never been, to restrict press freedom. Fifa would like to make it clear that it does respect the freedom of the press. Editorial independence in the coverage of the Fifa World Cup is guaranteed and this principle is enshrined in Article 1 of the terms and conditions, the second paragraph of which states as follows: For the avoidance of doubt, nothing in the terms and conditions is intended to be, or shall be interpreted as restricting or undermining the editorial independence or freedom to report and comment of Accredited Parties. This is an overall principle and, as the wording implies, the terms which are the cause of the complaint must always be read bearing this principle in mind. We should also point out that the particular provision which has been complained about as restricting the freedom of the press was contained in the media accreditation terms and conditions for the Fifa Confederations Cup South Africa 2009. There were no complaints regarding press freedom on that occasion and there is no instance of Fifa have abused the provision to restrict press freedom.last_img read more

Google Earth Builder: Managing & Mapping Companies’ Geo-Data

first_imgGoogle’s mapping tools – namely Google Earth and Google Maps – are among its most successful consumer-facing products. Google Earth alone has been downloaded more than 700,000,000 times. But the company today is aiming to expand the reach of those services by targeting the enterprise market with a brand new tool: Google Earth Builder.The new product will let companies upload, process and store their geospatial data in the Google cloud. As it utilizes the popular Google Maps and Google Earth tools, Earth Builder will enable users to share and publish mapping data without requiring any technical expertise or GIS training.In announcing the new product, Google points out that, “in the enterprise a lot of geospatial data remains trapped on costly servers and inaccessible to those who need it. We’d like to help free that data and bring the same benefits that consumers have enjoyed for years to businesses and government agencies.” That sounds pretty noble, but it’s also likely to be incredibly lucrative. Google Earth Builder could provide a cloud-based alternative to many of the GIS software packages already on the market. The new package, which will officially launch this summer, will be priced “competitively” with similar software offerings already on the market.But as Business Insider’s Matt Rosoff rightly points out, the savings may be at the level of hardware as much as hardware. Not only will companies be able to store massive amounts of data (“terabytes of imagery,” in Google’s words), but they’ll have access to the computational power of Google’s cloud as well. Tags:#enterprise#NYT#Products audrey watters Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Nowcenter_img Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

Microsoft, Facing Lackluster Surface Sales, May Get Small

first_imgTags:#Microsoft#Surface#tablet markhachman Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Perhaps you’re not a fan of Microsoft’s Surface tablet. Would you prefer to try something a little… smaller? Microsoft might be ready to oblige you.According to the Wall Street Journal, Microsoft that it apparently plans a smaller 7-inch Surface, one that would compete with the Google Nexus 7, the iPad Mini, and Amazon’s Kindle Fire. It will apparently launch the new product as part of a broader overhaul of its Surface tablet lineup later this year.Microsoft may have had little choice. Its Surface and Surface RT tablets haven’t exactly lit the world on fire, while sales of the smaller iPad and Android tablets have taken off.Microsoft originally envisioned the Surface as an answer to the exploding tablet market, which is starting to dominate the computing landscape and is cutting into sales of traditional PCs. Microsoft hasn’t formally released sales numbers, but IHS iSuppli estimated that Microsoft sold, at most, one million Surface tablets during the fourth quarter, compared to a record 22.9 million Apple iPads, plus millions more Nexus 7s, Kindle Fires, and other 7-inch tablets.The Surface, of course, has been hampered by its relatively high price, consumer dissatisfaction with the new Windows 8/RT operating system, and the lack of Windows RT applications for the Surface RT. It’s worth noting that both of the latter  factors would weigh every bit as heavily on a hypothetical Surface Small.But what impact would shrinking the form factor have on the Surface? Let’s take a look.Portrait Mode ProblemsOn the, er, surface, shrinking the Surface to a 7-inch form factor is a terrific idea. A 7-inch tablet is slender enough for most male hands to hold comfortably, and it fits well inside a purse, protective sleeve, or the relatively roomy pockets of my khakis. As Amazon’s Kindle demonstrated, the tablet is about the size of a book page.But orienting the Surface in portrait mode — the most comfortable way of holding a 7-inch tablet, in my opinion — is problematic. From my experience in playing with the Surface (I don’t own one), some apps work well in portrait mode. But the Windows 8 desktop isn’t really optimized for vertical viewing.Analyst Tim Bajarin concluded much the same thing:Windows 8 and Surface appear to be built primarily for one mode: landscape. Given that Windows 8 is built for a 16:9 format, this is not surprising; the software was architected for landscape. Although the screen can be used in portrait mode, doing so presents a far less enjoyable experience than in landscape. For some, this may not be a problem, but for me it is fundamentally counter-intuitive to what I consider a pure tablet experience.Specifically, Bajarin called out Skype and the Office keyboard for failing to work in portrait mode. Of course, there’s no reason Microsoft couldn’t update the Windows software and apps to better support portrait mode. It would have to do so, though, to make a smaller 7-inch Surface a pleasant user experience by the time that product launched.Shifting From Writing to ReadingOne of the chief advantages of the Windows RT version of Surface is the Office package that Microsoft bundles with it. The 32GB version of Windows RT costs $599 with a Touch Cover; for $139.99, you can buy a standalone version of Office Home and Student 2013 for a PC. In other words, Microsoft is tossing in a software package worth a quarter of the Surface RT’s price, for free.Users could continue to use Office within a 7-inch environment. But combining Office with a Touch or Type Cover turns the Surface into a content-creation device. There’s really no way Microsoft could release a 7-inch Touch Cover, or bundle a full-sized Touch Cover with a 7-inch device. Both would look awkward. (Yes, like other tablets, you could still wirelessly connect a Bluetooth keyboard.)If you remove those elements, the Surface probably sinks to the level of a Nexus 7 or Kindle Fire, both designed as shopping and read/watch/play portals to the Google and Amazon content stores. In this space, Microsoft simply doesn’t have the clout to compete with the other two vendors, and its lack of apps versus the iPad mini will be thrown into sharper focus.Metro Only?Could Microsoft design a 7-inch Surface strictly around the Metro interface? It would be a bold move, and a risky one; again, Microsoft would risk frustrated consumers fumbling around with Web pages when rival tablets had dedicated apps in place to perform the same functions.But the Windows 8 desktop environment would probably look even more out of place in a 7-inch form factor than on the larger 10-inch Surface. And on Windows RT — the only real Windows OS one would run on a 7-inch tablet, with an ARM chip inside — the desktop is sort of an afterthought, anyway. At that point, Microsoft would probably have to decide to eliminate Office from the tablet altogether.Thank goodness there’s a Netflix Windows RT app.Xbox Integration?Microsoft has already taken the first steps toward combining the Xbox 360 game console, tablets and phones with SmartGlass, an app that makes the mobile device a “second screen” for gameplay. If Microsoft were to release a tablet optimized for playing games and watching TV or movies, what better way to do than to align it with the Xbox?Years ago, Microsoft developed a line of small tablets dubbed UMPCs, which failed to take off, among other reasons, because their battery life stank (i.e., it was on the order of a few hours). But maybe the time is right to try a smaller Microsoft tablet once again.Some love the Surface. I think it’s great, and I still may pick up a Surface with a Type Cover myself. Thinking that shrinking the Surface down to a 7-inch form factor will immediately revitalize sales, though, is wishful thinking. Still, Microsoft needs something to jumpstart sales, and a conservative, follow-the-leader approach towards a smaller form factor can’t hurt. But Microsoft risks losing a lot of what makes a Surface a Surface if it does so. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts last_img read more