Omnibus Talks Still Not Wrapped Up

first_imgNegotiators made substantial progress over the weekend on a fiscal 2016 omnibus spending bill, and as of Sunday afternoon both parties were aiming to release the text of the measure late Monday.Significant issues still remained as Democrats and Republicans strived to strike a deal on a $1.1 trillion year-end spending agreement, though, and the schedule remains uncertain, reported CQ.The latest timeline means Congress may be forced to pass a third continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown after midnight Wednesday. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has pledged to follow the GOP rule requiring legislation to be available for three days before the chamber can vote on it, so lawmakers likely will need at least one additional day to clear the omnibus. The Senate also would need additional time to advance the spending package.On Friday the House passed a five-day CR, which President Obama signed later that day.The omnibus is expected to contain full-year spending plans for all 12 annual spending bills. One outstanding question Republican leaders need to determine is whether to attach a package of permanent tax extensions to the spending package.House Appropriations Chair Harold Rogers (R-Ky.) on Friday described the high-level talks as “slow” and “snail-like, glacial, in fact.” Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Despite Being Overlooked Detroit to Make a Pitch for Army Futures Command

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR A team of economic development organizations representing Detroit is submitting a proposal to the task force selecting the headquarters location for the Army’s new Futures Command even though the Army did not include the city in the list of 15 finalists it released in April. Detroit’s strong showing in three of the four categories — private sector innovation, talent, and strength of research and development resources for STEM — the Army’s consultant used to rank 30 candidates helped Michigan Sen. Gary Peters (D) persuade Army Secretary Mark Esper to allow the city to submit a bid, reported the Detroit Free Press. Detroit was left off the initial list of finalists because of its poor showing in the fourth attribute, quality of life, particularly due to a low ranking in a criterion measuring the region’s overall health and access to medical care. Peters believes that Michigan, which hosts the Tank-automotive and Armaments Command and the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, is “the obvious place” to locate a futures command for a ground force military organization. “We want to be seen as the place the Army wants to be as it thinks about the future of technology and warfare,” he said. Army photo by Carl Jones IIlast_img read more

Facebooks message to video creators Lets make more money

first_img Post a comment Share your voice 0 Now playing: Watch this: Is Facebook spying on you? On Tuesday, Facebook also said that a slice of money from any subscribers who sign up after this year will be diverted to Facebook. Early pages that tested subscriptions, thus far, didn’t need to share any revenue except the 30% bit that Apple and Google take of all media subscriptions that happen as in-app purchases in Facebook’s mobile app. But starting with any subscribers who sign up beginning Jan. 1, Facebook will take 30% of revenue from desktop subscribers. It’ll take 15% of revenue paid by mobile subscribers but only starting in the second year of a subscription. The social giant said its ad-breaks feature would be introducing ways for creators to specify when a midroll commercial cuts into their video. Brand Collabs Manager, an interface that helps online video creators connect with sponsorships, will be enhanced with more analytics. Facebook’s subscriptions option, which lets fans pay creators on a monthly basis, will be expanding to let creators offer supporter-only groups as a benefit to subscribing, so superfans and creators can interact in a more intimate forum. The company is also testing Stars, little stickerlike icons mostly for gaming-video fans that pay a creator a penny whenever you send one his or her way. Similar to the Bits Emotes on Twitch, viewers can send Stars while watching live gaming streams.  Tags Facebook will be taking a cut of money headed to video creators. Claudia Cruz/CNET Facebook is giving videos on its social network more ways to make money, pulling inspiration from other platforms to let you throw cash at your favorite video creators in the form of subscriptions or tokenized “stars” that pay them a penny. It’s also going to start taking a cut of the money that superfans send to creators in paid subscriptions.Facebook announced the new developments ahead of VidCon, the world’s biggest conference for online video creators. VidCon runs Wednesday through Saturday in Anaheim, California. The approach follows a proven Facebook strategy of borrowing features and tools that smaller social networks have rolled out to popular appeal. In the last three years, Facebook made big investments in video as a central part of its service, aiming to eat some of YouTube’s lunch and take a bite of the television ad dollars migrating to digital video. But some of its efforts, like broadcasting original scripted series, have failed to break through to mass audiences. Facebook didn’t provide any hard numbers about how many people are making money on its platform with any of its early-stage money-making tools like ads and subscriptions. Generally, tens of thousands of pages are using ad breaks in videos to make money, the company said. The number of pages earning $10,000 a year with ad breaks has grown since Facebook began testing them about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t provide specifics.  1:39 Mobile Digital Media Facebooklast_img read more

KSA planned to deport 250 Rohingyas to Bangladesh

first_imgScores of Rohingya Muslims sit on the floor of the Shumaisi detention centre in Jeddah, as Saudi authorities prepare to deport the men to Bangladesh. Photo: AljazeeraSaudi Arabia is planning to deport 250 Rohingya men to Bangladesh, in what will be the second forced deportation by Riyadh this year, Al Jazeera quoted an activist group as saying.Saudi Arabia is home to almost 300,000 Rohingya, according to Nay San Lwin, campaign coordinator for the Free Rohingya Coalition, who urged authorities to stop the deportations, adding that the men faced imprisonment in Bangladesh upon their arrival.”Majority of these Rohingya have residency permits and can live in Saudi Arabia legally,” Nay San Lwin told Al Jazeera.”But these detainees, who are being kept in the Shumaisi detention centre [in Jeddah], have not been treated like their fellow Rohingya. Instead, they are being treated like criminals.”According to one video obtained by Nay San Lwin, the Rohingya, most of whom arrived in the country several years ago, were being prepared to be taken to Jeddah international airport on Sunday where they would then board direct flights to Dhaka.He said the men were expected to be flown out either late on Sunday or Monday evening.Nay San Lwin added that many of the Rohingya entered Saudi Arabia after obtaining passports belonging to countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh, India and Nepal through smugglers via fake documents.Nay San Lwin added that many of the Rohingya entered Saudi Arabia after obtaining passports belonging to countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh, India and Nepal through smugglers via fake documents.Myanmar stripped the Rohingya of their citizenship in 1982, rendering them stateless.Under the 1982 Citizenship Law, the Rohingya were not recognised as one of the country’s 135 ethnic groups, restricting their rights to study, work, travel, marry, vote, practise their religion and access health services.Saudi Arabia stopped issuing residency permits to Rohingya who entered the country after 2011.Nay San Lwin said that several human rights activists had appealed to Saudi authorities over the past two years and that he had personally approached Saudi officials and diplomats to intervene.”When these Rohingyas arrive in Bangladesh, they could be jailed,” he said. “Saudi Arabia should stop these deportations and grant them residency permits like the other Rohingyas who arrived in the country before them.”Last year, Middle East Eye (MEE) reported that Rohingya detainees were being prepared for deportation shortly after Bangladeshi prime minister Sheikh Hasina visited Saudi Arabia.Some of the detainees held at the Shumaisi detention centre said they had lived in the kingdom their entire lives and had been sent to the facility after Saudi police found them without identification papers.Described as the “world’s most persecuted minority”, around one million Rohingya fled to neighbouring Bangladesh in late 2017 when the Myanmar army launched a brutal campaign against them.The UN accused government soldiers and local Buddhists of massacring families, burning hundreds of villages and carrying out mass gang rapes.Myanmar denies the allegations, saying security forces are battling armed rebels.However, many of the refugees housed in the cramped and unsanitary camps in Bangladesh said they feared returning to Myanmar without guaranteed rights such as citizenship, access to healthcare and freedom of movement.last_img read more