Facebooks message to video creators Lets make more money

first_img Post a comment Share your voice 0 Now playing: Watch this: Is Facebook spying on you? On Tuesday, Facebook also said that a slice of money from any subscribers who sign up after this year will be diverted to Facebook. Early pages that tested subscriptions, thus far, didn’t need to share any revenue except the 30% bit that Apple and Google take of all media subscriptions that happen as in-app purchases in Facebook’s mobile app. But starting with any subscribers who sign up beginning Jan. 1, Facebook will take 30% of revenue from desktop subscribers. It’ll take 15% of revenue paid by mobile subscribers but only starting in the second year of a subscription. The social giant said its ad-breaks feature would be introducing ways for creators to specify when a midroll commercial cuts into their video. Brand Collabs Manager, an interface that helps online video creators connect with sponsorships, will be enhanced with more analytics. Facebook’s subscriptions option, which lets fans pay creators on a monthly basis, will be expanding to let creators offer supporter-only groups as a benefit to subscribing, so superfans and creators can interact in a more intimate forum. The company is also testing Stars, little stickerlike icons mostly for gaming-video fans that pay a creator a penny whenever you send one his or her way. Similar to the Bits Emotes on Twitch, viewers can send Stars while watching live gaming streams.  Tags Facebook will be taking a cut of money headed to video creators. Claudia Cruz/CNET Facebook is giving videos on its social network more ways to make money, pulling inspiration from other platforms to let you throw cash at your favorite video creators in the form of subscriptions or tokenized “stars” that pay them a penny. It’s also going to start taking a cut of the money that superfans send to creators in paid subscriptions.Facebook announced the new developments ahead of VidCon, the world’s biggest conference for online video creators. VidCon runs Wednesday through Saturday in Anaheim, California. The approach follows a proven Facebook strategy of borrowing features and tools that smaller social networks have rolled out to popular appeal. In the last three years, Facebook made big investments in video as a central part of its service, aiming to eat some of YouTube’s lunch and take a bite of the television ad dollars migrating to digital video. But some of its efforts, like broadcasting original scripted series, have failed to break through to mass audiences. Facebook didn’t provide any hard numbers about how many people are making money on its platform with any of its early-stage money-making tools like ads and subscriptions. Generally, tens of thousands of pages are using ad breaks in videos to make money, the company said. The number of pages earning $10,000 a year with ad breaks has grown since Facebook began testing them about a year ago, but the company wouldn’t provide specifics.  1:39 Mobile Digital Media Facebooklast_img read more

Researchers discover first manganese based superconductor

first_img Citation: Researchers discover first manganese based superconductor (2015, March 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-03-manganese-based-superconductor.html Electron spin could be the key to high-temperature superconductivity (Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from the Institute of Physics in China and the University of Tokyo has found the first instance of a manganese based superconductor. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes the technique they used to discover the superconductor properties in the material which many had thought would not be possible due to its high degree of magnetism. Pressure-temperature phase diagram of the helical magnet MnP [8]. Although several different magnetic phases are indicated—helical (Screw), ferromagnetic (FM), and antiferromagnetic (AFM)—all are likely to be variants of the helical phase. Suppression of the magnetism by pressure gives rise to a superconducting phase, similar to what is observed in the related helical magnet CrAs [5, 6], as seen in the inset, where the resistivity versus temperature at a pressure of 8.1 GPa is plotted. Credit: Jin-Guang Cheng/Beijing National Laboratory Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Pressure Induced Superconductivity on the border of Magnetic Order in MnP, J.-G. Cheng, K. Matsubayashi, W. Wu, J. P. Sun, F. K. Lin, J. L. Luo, and Y. Uwatoko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 117001 – Published 16 March 2015 . journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/ … ysRevLett.114.117001 . On Arxiv: arxiv.org/abs/1412.7883ABSTRACTWe report the discovery of superconductivity on the border of long-range magnetic order in the itinerant-electron helimagnet MnP via the application of high pressure. Superconductivity with Tsc≈1  K emerges and exists merely near the critical pressure Pc≈8  GPa, where the long-range magnetic order just vanishes. The present finding makes MnP the first Mn-based superconductor. The close proximity of superconductivity to a magnetic instability suggests an unconventional pairing mechanism. Moreover, the detailed analysis of the normal-state transport properties evidenced non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the dramatic enhancement of the quasiparticle effective mass near Pc associated with the magnetic quantum fluctuations. , arXiv Journal information: Physical Review Letters © 2015 Phys.org Until recently, the idea that a material such as manganese phosphide could have a superconducting state, was ruled out because conventional superconductors have a property where electrons formed couplets known as Cooper pairs—and magnetism disrupted them. But then it was found that using magnetism suppression techniques allowed researchers to discover superconductor states in some organic or even iron based materials where it wasn’t driven by Cooper pairs. In this new effort, the researchers worked backwards, subjecting materials to both a range of temperatures and varying degrees of pressure. That allowed them to test the properties of materials over a whole range of scenarios that might be likely to allow for a superconducting state to exist and to create phase diagrams. In so doing, they found that putting a sample of manganese phosphide in a freezer at 1K and then increasing pressure to 8 gigapascals suppressed its magnetism which led to a sudden drop in resistivity and thus a superconducting state. Also, because of the high percentage of volume fraction, the researchers were able to rule out the chance that the property was localized.Manganese phosphide is a helical magnet, the researchers note—which suggests that other materials with a magnetic spin that is shaped like a spiral might exist. But that isn’t the end of study for manganese phosphide, thus far nothing else is known about its superconducting state—that means more research will have to be done learn more about it in general and to find out if it might be useful for some applications. But meanwhile, because their technique worked so well, the researchers plan to carry out similar experiments on a wide variety of other materials to find out if some of them might have superconducting properties under certain conditions as well.last_img read more