Encroachment Effort at MacDill AFB Leaves State Officials Frustrated

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The state of Florida this week agreed to purchase the residential development rights on a 25-acre parcel adjacent to MacDill Air Force Base in South Tampa even though the landowner will retain the right to build a hotel or motel on the parcel’s north end.The $1.3 million purchase will prevent residential development in MacDill’s clear zone and accident potential zone, but the state was only able to reach agreement to purchase the development rights for a hotel or motel on 11 acres in the airfield’s clear zone, reported the Tampa Bay Times.Still, it’s the best deal the state could get, said Bruce Grant, executive director of the Florida Defense Support Task Force.“It is not optimum and it doesn’t take care of the entire problem, but it does take care of part of the problem,” Grant said.A hotel or motel built on the parcel’s north end would be in the accident potential zone, making it incompatible with MacDill’s mission, Col. Patrick Miller, commander of the 6th Mission Support Group, told Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) and the Florida Cabinet before their Tuesday vote.State officials expressed frustration over the inability to fully protect the installation from development. “I have reticence that we were unable to negotiate away a future hotel at the end of a runway,” said Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.Separately, the Cabinet voted to spend $1.5 million to buy more than 600 acres near Whiting Field in Panama City, according to the story.last_img read more

Enter for your chance to win a Fluance audio system

first_img 6 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. One lucky person will receive this turntable, these speakers and a bonus Bluetooth speaker. CNET It’s giveaway time! And once again the fabulous Fluance folks are offering Cheapskate readers a shot at some fantastic audio gear. Welcome to the Fluance Sound Sweeps! Here’s what the grand prize winner will bring home: A limited-edition RT81 record player (white)A pair of limited-edition Ai40 powered bookshelf speakers (white)An Fi20 Bluetooth speaker (bamboo)Total value of that package: a cool $500. And two runners-up will each receive a Fluance Fi20 speaker (one in walnut, one in black ash) worth $150. The turntable and speakers, by the way, are indeed limited-edition items, announced just yesterday to help celebrate Fluance’s 20th anniversary. Only a small quantity will be produced, so this is your chance to own a little bit of Fluance history. What’s more, with promo code CNET10FLU, anyone can get $10 off any order of $100 or more between now and Aug. 27.Ready to enter? You’ve got until Sept. 6 to get it done. Hit up the form below for all the details, including the rules and requirements.If you have trouble seeing the form please check this link.Good luck!Update, 11:46 a.m. PT: Corrected promo code discount to $10 off. (It incorrectly said 10% earlier. We apologize for the mistake.)CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page. Share your voice CNET Giveaway The Cheapskatecenter_img Comments Tags Audiolast_img read more

New Blended Learning Curriculum Seeks to Improve DC Public Schools

first_imgLow-performing schools have been a chronic problem in the District. But a new tool, blended learning, has local school officials hopeful that they may be solving the issue and turning the tide.According to Ed Tech magazine, blended learning is an education model that integrates online instruction with the traditional classroom learning experience. Instead of all students in a classroom working from the same textbook, blended learning allows individuals to engage with material at their own pace.John Rice, blended learning manager for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Office of Teaching Learning, has an even simpler definition.“Blended learning is a combination of the best of what teachers can do with the best of what technology can do in the classroom,” he told the AFRO.The technology-driven model first entered DCPS in math classrooms approximately six years ago. Before 2011, its use was described as “haphazard” by the American Enterprise Institute, because a centralized strategy did not exist. Blended learning appeared “only in places where enterprising teachers or administrators had decided to experiment on their own,” according to a case study, “Blended Learning in DC Public Schools.”However, since then, implementation of the learning tool has picked up because it has the ability to “meet students where they are,” school officials said. Blended learning was first used to increase technical skills in Algebra.“Blended learning levels the playing field,” said Rice. “It helps educators find the right lesson for students’ rights where they are in their current stage of learning.”After seeing successful results in mathematics, school officials expanded into other curriculums and areas of study. Some form of blended learning can be found in at least eight of the city’s public schools; public charter schools also use the model.“Chancellor [Kaya] Henderson believes in the application and power of technology across all levels of learning,” David Rose, DCPS deputy chief of educational technology and library programs told the AFRO. “This makes our school district different from others which may only have these models in certain schools or grades. You can find blended learning in classrooms across the K-12 spectrum.”Randle Highlands Elementary School in Southeast is one of the successful DCPS schools utilizing blended learning. School officials have seen an improvement in math and reading scores, and a decline in teacher turnover and student suspensions since the program began.Reactions to the new model have remained positive among teachers, parents, and students. School officials said parents enjoy learning about new technology with their children, and students enjoy using cutting-edge materials.Initially, veteran teachers seemed hesitant toward the new technology and curriculum model, but DCPS officials have worked to make professional development integral to the program’s roll-out.“We place big emphasis on professional development for our teachers and have committed resources district-wide to aid in this effort,” said Rose.One of the concerns about the program is whether it can be continued when a child returns home.“We recognize that not all of our families have technology or significant resources at home and, at the same time, we live in a world where a comfort level with technology is nearly a requirement,” said Melissa Salmanowitz, a spokesperson for DCPS. “We want our students to surpass this requirement.”last_img read more